Monthly Archives: April 2017

Authentic Piedmont in New York City

San Carlo Osteria in New York City’s Soho neighborhood offers some of the finest Piemontese food we have eaten outside of Italy’s Piedmont Region. Our friend Gianfrancesco Mottola suggested that we try it and considering his sophisticated taste, we knew that it would be something special.

Once we were comfortably seated, our personable waiter Mirko asked us if we would like the chef to prepare a tasting menuA. With so many good things to try on the menu, that sounded like a good idea.

Our first dish was a plate of three appetizers typical of Piedmont including Battuta di Fassone, beef tartar topped with a quail egg. Made from the classic Fassone breed of grass fed cattle from Piedmont, the meat was tender and buttery. “Tonno” di Coniglio consisted of chunks of poached rabbit in a tasty olive oil marinade served with pickled vegetables in the style of tuna. The chef’s version of Vitello Tonnato at San Carlo is thinly sliced rare veal served with a creamy tuna sauce with capers. Because the veal was not coated with the sauce, its delicate flavor was able to shine through.

The next course was Ravioli del Plin in Brodo di Bollito Misto, homemade meat filled ravioli with a pinch, known as a “plin” in Piemontese dialect, in a flavorful mixed meat broth. It was perfect for a chilly night, though the ravioli can also be had in a classic butter and sage sauce.

The Chestnut Gnocchi with porcini mushroom sauce and creamy Parmesan fondue were unusual. The homemade gnocchi were made with chestnut flour that gave them a sweet and slightly smoky flavor. Charles liked them so much that he ate both of our portions.

Brasato con Polenta Taragna, meltingly tender beef cheek was served with buckwheat polenta, the perfect foil for the dark deep flavors of the beefy red wine sauce.

Dessert was another Piemontese classic, Bonet, a luscious chocolate, caramel and amaretto custard.

San Carlo’s wine list starts at $40 and there is a selection of half bottles and wines by the glass. The list is all Italian wines from all over Italy, as well as a few champagnes. The main concentration are the wines of Piedmont such as Timorasso, Erbaluce di Caluso, Arneis, Gavi. Moscato d’Asti, Dolcetto, Barbera, Nebbiolo Barbaresco and Barolo.

San Carlo Osteria is sleek and modern looking. On warm nights the entire front wall of windows facing the street can be thrown open. It’s not a big restaurant, so reservations are recommended. Call 212-625-1212 or contact them on line at http://www.sancarlonyc.com/. The address is 90 Thompson Street.

 

 

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In the Shadow of the Volcano

Our stay in Naples in February was an adventure both in the city and in the countryside.

Marina Alaimo, a journalist I met in Naples last year, offered to take Michele and I to Haccademia, one of her favorite pizzerias. It is in Terzigno on the road from Naples to Vesuvius. We took the Circumvesuviana, the train that goes around Naples and met Marina in a town a few stops outside of Naples. She drove us straight to the pizzeria where we met the owner Aniello Falanga and his son Nicola who made us a variety of excellent pizzas to taste. Marina ordered the Piedirosso Frupa from the Sorrentino winery to go with the pizza. When I said I liked the wine and that it went very well with the pizza, Marina replied that the winery is only ten minutes away and suggested we go there next.

Sorrentino  Winery is located at the foot of Mount Vesuvius in a famous archeological area shaped like a large pentagon made up of  the ancient towns of Pompei, Oplontis, Stabia and Ercolano, and the Gulf of Naples.  It is a family run winery operated by the father Paolo and his three children, Giuseppe (Director), and daughters Maria Paola and Benny (Winemaker).

Giuseppe took us on a tour and said that the winery is located in Boscotrecase, the ancient Silva Mala.  The sight of Mount Vesuvius looming over the vineyards was awesome.

Rock formed from Lava

He said that the Vesuvius region is the most extended volcanic area in continental Europe. The volcanic sandy soil is by its very nature resistant to parasites like the phylloxera (microscopic insects attacking the roots of the vines, which wiped out most of the vineyards in Europe). Giuseppe went on to explain that all of the vineyards are located on the southwest and south side of Vesuvius where the numerous lava flows reached the sea. The soil here is enriched with minerals and is very fertile. This represents the first line of defense against phylloxera and the preservation of ungrafted vines.

Since the vineyards are phylloxera free, unlike almost all the other vineyards in Europe, these vines are not grafted onto American rootstock. The favorable conditions in the vineyards have always made them close to organic and currently they produce fully organic grapes. Only natural fertilizers are used and there is no addition of synthetic chemicals. The training system is the traditional pergola and the espalier.

Between the rows of vines they plant herbs and vegetables such as tomatoes, peppers and zucchini so biodiversity is maintained in the vineyards and beneficial organisms favor the soil.

The Wines

Falanghina “Latikadea” IGT Made from 100% Falanghina The soil is volcanic and sandy, the training system is guyot and the vineyards are at 500 meters. Fermentation is in stainless steel and the wine remains in bottle for at least one month before release. Harvest takes place at the end of September. The wine has flavors and aromas of citrus fruit with hints of pineapple and floral notes.

Organic Falanghina Verso IGT 100% Falanghina The soil is volcanic and sandy. The training system is guyot and the vineyards are at 500 meters. Harvest is at the end of September. Fermentation is in steel and the wine remains in the bottle for at least one month before release. The wine has aromas and flavors of citrus fruit with hints of pineapple.

Lacryma Christi del Vesuvio selezione “Vigna Lapillo” Bianco DOC made from 80% Coda di Volpe and 20% Falanghina. The soil is volcanic and sandy, the training system is guyot and the vineyards are at 500 meters. The harvest is at the end of September. Fermentation is in steel and the wine remains in the bottle for one month before release. The wine has hints of white perches, and pears with a hint of almonds and good minerality. Giuseppe said that this vineyard is one of the closest to the Vesuvius crater.

Piedrosso “Frupa” IGT made from 100% Piedirosso. The soil is volcanic and sandy, the training system is guyot and the vineyards are at 600 meters. Harvest takes place in the middle of October. Fermentation is in steel and the wine ages for at least 12 months in French oak, then for 3 months in bottle before release. This is a fruity wine with hints of plum, cherry, and a touch of spice and pepper. We had this wine with pizza at Haccademia.

“Don Paolo” Organic Aglianico Pompeiano 100% Giuseppe said this was their finest cru dedicated to their father Paolo. The soil is volcanic and sandy. Training system is guyot and cordone speronato and the vines are at 600 meters. Harvest is at the end of October. The wine is aged in 25 to 50 HL French oak barrels for 16 to 18 months and in bottle for 5 to 6 months before release. This is a full bodied complex wine with hints of cherry, strawberry and notes of spice and coffee.

 

 

 

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Champagne, Old Wine, and Lamb for Easter

With temperatures expected to be in the 80’s on Easter Sunday, we invited friends to come for lunch at 2:00 PM so we could sit on the terrace and enjoy our Champagne and appetizers al fresco. It was windy but we managed by holding on to the Champagne glasses. Just as we finished, it started to rain so we had to go inside to enjoy the rest of the meal. 

Taittinger Comtes de Champagne 1993 Millesime Rose is made from 100% Grand Cru grapes and produced only in exceptional years. The Chardonnay grapes come from the most renowned vineyards of the prestigious Côte des Blancs, and the Pinot Noir from the Montagne de Reims. Only juice from the first pressing is used in order to ensure the structure and long aging potential that is essential to this exceptional Champagne. 12% of the Pinot Noir is blended in as still red wine. It was showing its age but still with some red fruit and brioche in the finish and aftertaste. It was very drinkable.

Bourgogne Aligoté 2005 Domaine Bachelet 100% Chardonnay This is an elegant wine with citrus fruit aromas and flavors, livery and fresh with nice minerality and showing no signs of age.

Mazoyères-Chambertin 1945 100% Pinot Noir  Chanut Frères. It was drinking very well for a wine this old.

With this wine we had risotto with porcini mushrooms and sausage

Gevrey-Chambertin “En Pallud” Domaine Maume 100% Pinot Noir. The vines are 70 years old and the soil is clay and limestone. There is separate vinification of individual parcels. Clusters are 100% destemmed. The wine is aged for 18 to 20 months in mostly older barrels and is bottled without fining or filtration. This is classic Burgundy at its best.

With it we ate lamb chops in a crisp breadcrumb and Parmesan crust with sauteed green beans and carrots.

Còte-Ròtie “Còtes Brune et Blonde” 1981 E. Guigal 96% Syrah and 4% Viognier. The average age of the vines is 35 years. Fermentation in closed stainless steel tanks, temperature controlled for about 3 weeks with automatic punching down. The wine is aged for 36 months, 50% in new oak. This is for the more current vintages. I do not know how they made it back in 1981! This is a wine with hints of raspberry and blackberry with a touch of spice. It is a complex wine with a lot of red and dark fruit aromas that are striking for a wine this old–the fruit still comes right at you.

We had this with two cheeses: Parmigiano Reggiano and Fontina Val D’Aosta.

For dessert, Michele made a flourless chocolate cake topped with whipped cream and raspberries.

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From Your Agent at Vinitaly- Daniele Cernilli

I did not attend Vinitaly this year so here is the next best thing a report by Daniele Cernilli aka Doctor Wine

Signed DW | Published on DoctorWine N°206

From your agent at Vinitaly

by Daniele Cernilli 17-04-2017

Daniele Cernilli seminari DoctorWine a Vinitaly 2017

Vinitaly has come and gone and it was the best is years. Despite all the problems afflicting the Italian wine sector, the atmosphere at the trade fair was really good, public attendance was hight and all the producers I spoke to were satisfied. Good thing. At our Doctor Wine stand we organized 11 seminars all which were packed full of interested and competent people. We received a lot of compliments and the only criticisms came from those who were on the waiting list and failed to get a place. I apologize for this but the space available was limited, only 28 seats while the demand was at times for as many as 50. We’ll see what we can do to improve this next year, I promise. As for the wines we tasted I must say there were some really good ones. I can start by saying that vintage 2013 for Barolo is not that far behind the legendary 2010. The more simple 2015 and 2015 reds were also formidable as were most of the whites. From Tuscany there were a lot of 2014 vintages and some of them, especially the Sassicaia, went far beyond expectations. Aside from these let me make a few suggestions. I’ll start with the Aglianico del Vulture Titolo 2015 from Elena Fucci which is delicious, perhaps the best ever. Then there is the remarkable Colli di Luni Vermentino Etichetta Nera 2016 of Lunae Bosoni which is fragrant and distinct more than ever. The fruit in Elio Altare’s Dolcetto d’Alba 2016 is as a defined and clear as only a great winemaker like himself can achieve. Surprising. The Barbera d’Asti Superiore L’Alfiera 2015, from Marchesi Alfieri, is very young yet more promising than usual. Tasting the Taurasi 2012 from the Fiorentino family, on the other hand, was a true eureka moment and a high-class debut. Alberto Longo’s Falanghina Le Fossette 2016 is from northern Puglia and unites fragrance and a precise bouquet with a saline and most pleasing flavor. Vermentino di Sardegna Camminera 2016 Audarya is a wine for those seeking a delicious white without maxing out their credit card. In the same category is the Soave Superiore Monte di Fice 2016 from the I Stefanini winery and I intend to acquire some for my own cellar and can already image drinking it this summer with a nice fish fry. These wines are neither rare nor too expensive and they impressed me for being well-made, representative of where they are from and, again, not excessively expensive. Last but not least I add a great red that is often overlooked because it is the estate’s second wine after its showcase Sassicaia. Guidalberto 2015 is a great vintage and perhaps the best since the legendary 2004 which was fantastic. While this may cost more than the others, it is truly well worth it.

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A Dinner Party in Rome

Daniele Cernilli, aka “Doctor Wine,” and his wife,  Marina Thompson invited us to dinner at their lovely apartment in one of the most fashionable neighborhoods in Rome.

There were 3 other guests, including a professor from John Cabot University in Rome.

Daniele greeted us with glasses of Champagne Clos des Goisses Brut 2002 made from 70% Pinot Noir and 30% Chardonnay. The grapes are grown on a pure chalk hillside with a 45 degree slope facing due south in Mareuil- sur-Ay. Goisse, in the old Champagne dialect, means steep slope. It has a very low dosage. Vinification is mainly in wooden casks and malolactic fermentation does not take place. This is a full-bodied wine with hints of pears and apricots, floral notes, a touch of toast and an exceptional long finish. Daniele said 2002 was a great vintage in Champagne.

With the Champagne we had caviar. You can’t go wrong with Champagne and caviar, and Marina enhanced the combination by serving it with burrata, a tender, fresh cheese from Puglia. Slightly firm like mozzarella on the outside, it is sweet and creamy within. Though it might seem like a strange combination, not only did it work, it was wonderful.

Daniele also served another wine with the caviar and burrata that he believed was a better combination than with the champagne. Pinot Bianco Colli Orientali del Friuli “Zuc di Volpe 2008 Volpe Pasini made from 100% Pinot Bianco from the Togliano “Zuc” Vineyard. Fermentation is in stainless steel and the wine spends some time in bottle before release. This is a full-bodied white wine with hints of white peaches, citrus and almonds. It was showing very little sign of age.

Though I liked the Pinot Bianco, I preferred the combination of the Champagne with the caviar and burrata.

Grignolino of the Monferrato Casalese “ Bricco del BoscoVigne Vecchie2011 Giulio Accornero & Figli made from 100% Grignolino from the Bricco del Bosco vineyard. Maceration is on the skins for 20 days. The wine is aged for 30 months in oak barrels (tonneau) and 24 months in bottle before release.

Daniele Cernilli

Every other Grignolino I have tasted was meant to be drunk young. By the time this one is released all the others would be too old to drink. Here is how Daniele describes this wine in his book The Ultimate Guide to Italian Wine 2017  Intense and lively red. One of the best versions of the last years. Complex smokey and spicy notes, raspberries, pomegranate and rhubarb. Strong, intense, warm, enveloping flavor with tannic hints and extraordinary persistence.” We discussed this wine for some time.

With this wine we had pasta prepared by Daniele. He told Michele that the recipe had been given to him by the late Paola di Mauro, a great winemaker and legendary cook. Daniele roasted sweet cherry tomatoes with olive oil, capers and breadcrumbs then tossed them mezze maniche, a short wide tubular pasta, before serving. It’s a great way to make the most of out of season fresh tomatoes.

Brunello di Montalcino 1995 100% Sangiovese Donatella Cinelli Colombini. I looked at the label and told Daniele that I have the 1995 at home but the label is different. He said this was a special bottling made in honor of a wedding that took place in 1995. I am not sure how this wine was made or aged and I know they have changed their production methods over the years. This wine is a classic Brunello.

We had the Brunello with braised veal.

Vin Santo del Chianti Classico 2005 Rocco di Montegrossi made from 95% Malvasia Bianco di Toscana and 5% Canaiolo Nero. The soil is calcareous loamy. The harvest is the first week of October. During the drying phase the bunches of grapes are hung one by one on nets in a well– ventilated area under the rafters. All of the nets are hung from rails and are affected by noble rot–botrytis. The rails allow the nets to be shifted so that deteriorated grapes can be removed. Pressing takes place in January. The must goes into small casks of 50 and 100 liters of cherry, oak and mulberry wood. The wine ferments and ages for 6 to 7 years, only indigenous yeast is used. This is a complex intense velvety dessert wine with hints of apricot, dried fig, toasted almond and caramel.The grapes are pressed between the 13 and 20th of December. Only organic farming methods are used and there is no filtering or fining. The wine spends 6 years and 4 months in small barrels called caratelli made of cherry, mulberry and oak wood, then one year in bottle before release.

With the Vin Santo we had cheese then finished with coffee and artisan chocolates.

 

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Sandro De Bruno Winery: A Long Over Due Visit

I first met Sandro Tasoniero, owner of the Sandro De Bruni winery, at a tasting in NYC a few years ago. I was impressed with his wines, especially the Soave. I told him I would write about his wines and visit him the next time I was in the Veneto. However for some reason it just did not happen.

This winter I had only one free day in Verona, the day I arrived. By coincidence, Elisa Bosco from PR Comunicare  IL Vino asked me if I would like to visit the Sandro de Bruno winery. I knew I would be tired from the flight but I still wanted to go. Elisa picked me up at the hotel and in a short time we arrived at the winery.

Sandro Tasoniero

The winery is located in Pergola di Montecchia di Crosara just outside of Verona and the vineyards are in Montecchia di Crosara and Terrossa, where there are 12 hectares of vines at 600 meters on Mount Calvarina, a dormant volcano. The soil is lava, enriched with minerals.

Sandro spoke about the terroir of Mount Calvarina an area with a unique and ideal microclimate with a range of temperatures between night and day. Good rainfall, daily sun exposure, constant ventilation and perfect drainage.

Sandro said they always apply the principles of sustainable and integrated agriculture in the winery and try to create a natural balance without interfering with nature. No chemical products are used and this also goes for the weeding. It is the perfect combination between organic and conventional farming.

The Wines

Lessini Durello DOC Metodo Classico Riserva “Durello” made from 85% Durello and 15 Pinot Bianco. From Monte Calvarina at 600 meters. The soil is volcanic, there are 4,000 plants per hectare, the average age of the vines is 30 years, the training system is Pergoletta Veronese and the exposure is south. Fermentation takes place in 30hl oak barrels for the Pinot Bianco and stainless steel for the Durello. This is a wine with nice bubbles and hints of white flowers and citrus fruit and a mineral undertone.

Soave Doc “Scaligeri” made from 100% Garganega from small plots of land located on the slopes of Mont Calvarina. The vineyard is at 4,000 meters and the average age of the vineyards is 20 years. The training system is Pergoletta Veronese and the exposure is south. The soil is volcanic. There is manual harvesting using crates, grape sorting, de-stemming, grape selection, then a slow crushing of the grapes and pressing with nitrogen saturation. Fermentation takes place in stainless steel. This is a wine with hints of pear, figs, and almonds with good minerality.

Soave Superiore DOCG “Monte San Pietro” made from 100% Garganega from the hills around Roncà, at 330 meters. The soil is volcanic, there are 4,000 vines per hectare, the training system is Pergoletta Veronese and the exposure is south. Fermentation is in big oak barrels of 30hl. This is a well-structured, complex wine with hints of tropical fruit, white pepper and vanilla. This soave can age, I tasted a few bottles from older vintages and I was impressed with all of them. Sandro said all of the wines remain in the cellar for at least one year before release. This is why the wines age so well, even the whites. Sandro makes some of the best Soave I have ever tasted.

Pinot Nero “Nero Fumo” IGt Veneto made from 100% Pinot Noir from Monte Calvarina at 580 meters. There are 7,000 vines per hectare, the training system is guyot and the exposure is south. The soil is volcanic with basaltic rocks. The name Nero Fumo, black smoke, is the typical color of the basaltic rock in the vineyards. There is a manual harvest using crates the third week September. There is a grape selection, de –stemming and a selection of berries. Fermentation is in conic vats and the must is punched down for 30 days. This is a fruity and full bodied wine with hints of red berries and spic

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Duccio Corsini and the Wines of Principe Corsini

Two weeks ago I hosted a tasting for wine journalists at Il Gattopardo Restaurant in NYC. One of the featured wines was the Chianti Classico Gran Selezione 2013 of Duccio Corsini. The wine had hints of dark cherries, plums, violets, dried roses, licorice and spice and I was very impressed by it.

A few days later, I had the opportunity to host another dinner and tasting, featuring again the wines of Duccio Corsini, this time including vintages of Don Tommaso going back to 1998.

Duccio Corsini is the owner of Principe Corsini wines and the Villa Le Corte estate. He is a counselor for the Chianti Classico Consortium. The Corsini Family is one of the oldest in Italy, going back to the 13th century. One of Duccio’s ancestors, the Cardinal Lorenzo Corsini, became Pope Clemente XII. If you visit the Villa Corsini in Rome you can see a painting of the Pope. In fact it contains one of the most important collections of paintings done after the year 1000 A.D including a painting of Saint John the Baptist by Caravaggio.

Duccio Corsini

At the tasting, Duccio told us about the estate and the wines and how the most recent release of Don Tommaso was produced.

Chianti Classico DOCG Gran Selezione “Don Tommaso” 2013 80% Sangiovese and 20% Merlot Principe Corsini, Villa Le Corte. The winery is located in San Casciano Val di Pesa. The vineyards are at 270-350 meters and have a southern exposure. Pilocenic hills rich in river stones. There are 5,800 plants per hectare. The training system is low-spurred cordon and the average age of vines is 25 years. This is a selection of the best grapes. They are hand harvested, destemmed and put in open frustum, cone–shaped stainless steel tanks at a controlled temperature. After 24 hours at 20°C the grapes are inoculated with selected indigenous yeasts. Fermentation for the Sangiovese is 18 days and for the Merlot is 16 days at a max temp of 28°C. The wine is aged in 70% new barriques and 30% in used barriques for 18 months and 12 months in bottle before release.

Don Tommaso Chianti Classico DOCG Villa Le Corte

1998 made from 95% Sangiovese and 5% Merlot. The wine was aged for 15 months in new French barriques.

1999 made from 90% Sangiovese and 10% Merlot. Aged for 15 months in new barriques for the most part and 6 months in bottle.

2000 made from 85% Sangiovese and 15% Merlot, aged for 15 months in Allier barriques for the most part and 6 months in bottle.

2007 made from 80% Sangiovese and 20% Merlot. 70% of the wine was aged in new barriques and 30% in used barriques for 15 months and 8 months in the bottle.

2010 Gran Selezione made from made from 80% Sangiovese and 20% Merlot. 70% of the wine is aged in new barriques and 30 in used barriques for 18 months and 12 months in bottle. I believe 2010 was the first year for the Gran Selezione category.

2013 Gran Selezione is the present release  – after tasting all of the different vintages of Don Tommaso it was easy to see that the different vintages had much in common and just got better as they aged. These wines are true Chianti Classico, with all the flavors and aromas one would expect from a great Chianti Classico. They are excellent food wines.

The wine I drank the most of was the 1998. It was starting to become mellow but still could age for a number of years.

When asked why he uses Merlot in the Don Tommaso, Duccio explained that Sangiovese has “rough edges and the Merlot smoothes them out.” He then pointed out that the Don Tommaso is the only wine he produces that has any non-Italian grapes.

Duccio said in recent vintages they are using less new barriques and are introducing some large barrels.

Fico 2015 IGT Toscana 100% Sangiovese From the Gugliaie vineyard, the name of the wine comes from the fig tree on the boundary of the vineyard, one of the finest on the property. Only organic farming methods are used. The wine is unfiltered and there are NO sulfites added.

The vineyard is at 270 meters with a southern exposure. There are 5,000 plants per hectare and the training system is spurred cordon. The vineyard is 2.6 hectares and the average age of the vines is 19 years. The harvest is manual. Destemming takes place and fermentation, in open vertical French oak barrels for 16 days. There is daily pumping down of the cap during fermentation. Bottled June 2016. There were only 280 bottles produced.

This wine was created by Filippo Corsini, the young son of Duccio who died tragically in a road accident in London on October 31. Duccio said that the wine is Filippo’s interpretation and own personal vision of winemaking.

This was the most unusual 100% Sangiovese I have ver tasted. One of the other journalists present said it tasted like a Pinot Noir, and we all agreed. It is a very elegant wine with subtle red fruit flavors and aromas.

Vino Spumante Rosato 100% Sangiovese San Casciano in Val di Pesa, Florence, the exposure is south and the average age of the of vines is 18 years. Charmat method is used through a soft pressing of whole grapes. Fermentation is on the must for 24 days at a low temperature (14°C). Secondary fermentation for 12 weeks and elevage on the yeasts for 1 month. The wine was bottled September 2015. It has nice bubbles with hints of pomegranate, strawberries and cranberries.

Villa Le Corti Chianti Classico DOCG 2014 San Casciano in Val di Pesa, Florence. Made from 95% Sangiovese and 5% Colorino. The vineyards are at 270 to 350 meters and the exposure is south. Soil: pliocenic hills rich in river stones and there are 5,800 plants per hectare. The training system is low spurred cordon and the average age of the vines is 25 years old. Harvest was from September 18 to September 29th. Fermentation is for 20 days at 28°C in open-air tanks with temperature control. The grapes are inoculated with select indigenous yeasts. Wine ages partially in vitrified cement vats for 12 months and part in large wood barrels.

Cortevecchia 2014 Chianti Classico Riserva 2014 harvest is by hand and grapes are destemmed and put in open air tahks with a temperature controlled system. After 24 hours at 20C. The grapes ate inoculated with select indigenous yeasts. Fermentation is for 14 days at 28C. The wine is aged for 20 months in big oak casks and part in tonneaux. The wine remains in the bottle for 6 months before release.

Vin Santo del Chianti Classico DOC 2004 60% Malvasia and 40% Trebbiano. Harvest by hand, grapes dried for 3 months “appassamento.” The dry grapes are pressed at the end of January and the juice is fermented in small barrels for 5 years. The wine “rests” for 10 years in the dark cellar before release. There were only 460 bottles produced.

Duccio said that this wine is very expensive to produce. First because it takes so long to reach the market and because after the wine ages for 5 years, he tastes it and if it does not measure up to his standards he will discard the wine. The wine has hints of honey and dried fruit, especially apricot. Very pleasant way to end a wonderful tasting.

 

 

 

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