Eating around Rome

 

After spending an exciting week in Naples, we left for Rome. A friend who was traveling with us suggested we leave early so that we could arrive in Rome in time for lunch.

Michele suggested La Campana, a restaurant close to the apartment we had rented but also because she remembered the

roasted maialino. She ordered it again.  The meat was moist and fork tender while the skin was crunchy.  It came with potatoes roasted with rosemary.  It is a dish to remember.

Due Ladroni.  This  restaurant specializes  in  fish,  which  is  always  very  fresh.  For  a first course I had

Polpo con Patate.  The potatoes were mashed with olive oil and the grilled octopus tendrils were cooked perfectly.

Next, I had Spaghetti ai Moscardini.

Moscardini are similar to baby octopus, but they are very tiny.  They add a wonderful briny flavor to the sauce, which seemed to contain

little besides some olive oil and the sauteed seafood.

We liked the moscardini so much that we decided to share a plate of Moscardini Fritti.  The waiter explained that these were actually pennette, slightly larger moscardini.

L’Angolo Divino is my favorite wine bar in Rome. Every time I go, I enjoy discussing wine with the owner, Massimo. This time we talked about wines made from the Cesanese grape.     Massimo suggested a mix of 5 Affettati to go with the wine.  They included speck, prosciutto, coppa and a spicy salame.

We also had the Bruschetta Lardo

Assortment of Cheese

Then we had the classic Ravioli filled with ricotta and spinach in a butter and sage sauce

I have often written about Checchino dal 1887, one  of   my  favorite Roman  restaurants.

At lunch, I started with an Artichoke alla Romana, cooked with olive oil and herbs.

I also had a plate of Fagioli e Cotiche,  borlotti  beans  cooked  with  pork  skin  for  smooth  texture  and  porky  flavor.

Checchino’s Pasta Alla Matriciana is my favorite version of this dish.  I always have it with bucatini.

Our friend Daniele Cernili, known as Doctor Wine, happened to be in the restaurant that day and recommended we try the  padellotto, a plate of innards typical of the restaurants in this section of Rome that special in the quinto quarto, the so-called fifth quarter of the animal.  There were kidneys, sweetbreads, liver and intestines, cooked with vinegar and rosemary.

Il Matriciano is another old favorite that disappointed us recently by updating its classic decor.  But we are happy to report that the food is still delicious.  We started with a plate of fried zucchini flowers and carciofi alla giudea, deep fried artichokes.

Abbacchio al Forno con patate

T

The Friday special was Baccalà, salt cod cooked in a tomato sauce with raisins and pine nuts.

Lo’steria  is  new  restaurant  for  us.  We  loved  the  starter,  a paper  sack  filled  with  fried  vegetables,  fried  bacala,  a rice  ball,  etc.  

This was Michele’s Bombolotti alla Matriciana.

I opted for the homemade tagliarini with broccoli.

Trattoria Dal Cavalier Gino  This  our  first  time  here  after  a number  of  years.  I had a classic  spaghetti  alla  carbonara.

Michele had the homemade tagliarini with crispy artichokes.  Loved the crunchy vegetable on top of the creamy pasta.

Finally, we had the Pollo alla Romana, chicken cooked in a rich sauce with green olives, tomatoes and peppers

We still have 9 more days in Rome and Michele  and I looking forward to more wonderful meals.

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4 Comments

Filed under Roman Restaurants, Roman restaurants, Rome

4 responses to “Eating around Rome

  1. Jonathan Levine

    How come I am always hungry after reading your posts?

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