Monthly Archives: January 2020

CAMPANIA DINNER AT KESTE WALL STREET

Keste Wall Street is doing a dinner series very Monday night with the food and wine of one of Italy’s 20 regions. The one which I attended was on the wine and food of Campania.

The Chefs that prepared the food were Roberto Caporuscio (owner of Keste), Angelo Competiello, Ciro Iovina (Song e Napule Pizza) and Domenico Tolomeo.

Appetizers

GATEAU DI PATATE Baked potatoes with eggs, salami, smoked buffala mozzarella, Parmigiano Reggiano and bread crumbs. –gluten free-

CAPONATA DI MARE Mixed seafood cooked separately and mixed together. –gluten free-

POLPETTE NAPOLETANE Neapolitan meatballs, with raisins, pine nuts, Parmigiano Reggiano, eggs. –gluten free-

PIZZA ALLA SCAROLA Pizza dough filled with cooked escarole and olives –gluten free-

Chef  Angelo Competiello  presenting the appetizers 

ALICI ALLA SCAPECE Fresh anchovies with lemon and mint

Chefs Ciro Iovina and Domenico Tolomeo

First Course

PASTA E PATATE Pasta Garofalo cooked with potatoes

PIZZA DEL MONACO Puree of zucchini and provolone del Monaco

PIZZA MARGHERITA made with tomato sauce, mozzarella and basil -it was not on the menu, it was something extra

Dessert

TORTA CAPRESE Chocolate cake with almond flour -gluten free-

PASTIERA NAPOLETANA Traditional Neapolitan cake with wheat berries and ricotta cheese 

There was a selection of wines from the Campania producer Fabulae

Asprinio “Jesce Soul” made from 100% Asprinio

Pallagrello Bianco made from 100% Pallagrello

Aglianco Sannio “Eduardo” made from 100% Aglianico

Roberto Caporuscio, our host, was the main speaker for the evening.  Next Monday, February 3, Keste Wall Street will be presenting a menu featuring the wine and food of Puglia.

Keste Wall Street   77 Fulton Street, NY, NY
(212) 693 – 9030

 

 

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under campania, Keste, Pizza, Pizza and Wine, Uncategorized

Fontanafredda: The Tradition Continues

Fontanafredda is one of the oldest wineries in  Piedmont, dating back about 160 years.  I visited the winery some years ago and wrote my first blog ever about a tasting of Fontanafredda Barolo in NYC.

About a week ago, Fontanafredda held their “2020 Press Tour”at Manzo Restaurant in Eataly Flatiron in New York.   In 2008 Oscar Farinetti, owner of the Eataly chain and other wineries, purchased the Fontanafredda winery.

Chiara and Giorgio

The speaker was Giorgio Lavagna, and the translator was Chiara Destefanis from the winery. Giorgio began working at Fontanafredda in 2014 and in 2018 he became Technical Director and Chief Winemaker.

The 250 acre Fontanafredda property is located in Serralunga (a cru site for Barolo). It is the single largest contiguous wine estate in the Langhe. In 2018 they became the largest certified organic company in Piedmont.

The wines

Alta Langa DOCG Contessa Rosa Rosé Spumante Metodo Classico 2012 made from 80% Pinot Noir and 20% Chardonnay with the addition of Barolo 1967. The soil is white clay alternated with layers of sand and calcareous marl.

Giorgio said a new method has been undertaken for this cuvee using a liqueur d’expedition with 1967 Barolo. Part of the Pinot Noir is left on the skins in temperature controlled stainless steel tanks for 12 to 24 hours. After maceration there is a soft pressing. The must ferments in stainless steel tanks at a low temperature and when the fermentation is complete, the wine is kept on the lees until spring. The cuvee is created, uniting the wines from the two fermentation processes. In May the wine undergoes a second fermentation process in the bottle, followed by a period of 48 months of maturing in contact with the yeast, in the cellars. The wine has hints of orange, ginger and pomegranate with very nice bubbles

The 5,000 acres cultivated with Nebbiolo for Barolo are divided into Menzione Geografica Aggiuntival (MGA), the equivalent of “cru.” Fontanafredda is the only 100% MGA winery owned by a single producer.

Barolo DOCG del Comune di Serralunga D’Alba 2015 made from 100% Nebbiolo. The soil has a high concentration of limestone and gray marl alternating with sand. Fermentation is for 15 days in stainless steel vats with a floating cap at a controlled temperature. The must stays in contact with the skins for another 15 days. Aging is in barriques mostly used and 2000 liter barrels from Allier. After a soft clarification, the wine is bottled for a further period of maturation in the bottle for not less then 12 months. Giorgio said 2015 was a truly great vintage. He described the wine as being dry and tannic with a velvety texture and great balance. Serralunga has the typical notes of vanilla, spices, roses and underbrush, trademark of the soil of Serralunga. This was the first single village Barolo produced (1988).    Chiara added that the stripes on the label mimic the striped design- of the buildings within the Fontanafredda Village.

Barolo DOCG Fontanafredda “Proprietà Fontanafredda” 2013 100% Nebbiolo. Giorgio said this plot of land is the border between soils of Helvetian and Tortonian origin. It is a soil with transitional characteristics, clayey marls alternated with layers of sand. Fermentation is in stainless steel vats at a controlled temperature. The new wine stays in contact with the grape marc for about a month. Aging is in medium and large oak barrels for two years and 12 months in bottle before release. The wine has hints of red berries, violets, and a note of licorice.

Giorgio said this was an “old style” vintage because the harvest took place 15 days later than any vintage in the last 10 years because of a cool and rainy spring. The wine is suited for aging.

Pasta: Agnolotti del Plin- Housemade Pasta Filled with Pork and Veal, Sugo d’Arrosto. This is a typical pasta from the Langhe

Barolo DOCG “Vigna La Rosa” 2011 made from 100% Nebbiolo. Giorgio said this 20 acre vineyard is one of the most prestigious on the estate. The rows face south, southwest to form an amphitheater, where the heat makes the berries mature perfectly. The soil is rich in sand mixed with limestone and the typical blue marl of Serralunga. The grapes are destemmed, crushed and ferment in heated condition stainless steel tanks at 28-30C. The wine is in contact with the skins and maceration lasts for about one month. Aging is oak Allier barrels, 50% new for about 12 months and then racked into oak casks of 2,000 and 3,000 liters for one year. The wine is bottled and released after one year. The wine hints of red fruit, violets and a touch of spice and tar.

Giorgio said 2011 was an unconventional vintage and the right moment for picking the grapes was most important.

Barolo DOCG Vigna La Rosa 1996 100% Nebbiolo.  I said 1996 was one of the last great vintages. Chiara added that in the beginning it was not looked upon as a great vintage. Giorgio answered it was a vintage for those that like old style Barolo.

He also mentioned 1978 and 1971 as great vintages but there were fewer great vintages back then. So in general the wines are better now because of global warming and improved wine making techniques (fermentation in stainless steel etc).

This was the wine of the tasting — classic Barolo with hints of red fruit, mushrooms, tobacco, licorice, tea and a note of violets. This wine will last. Looking back on my blog from 2012 the Vigna La Rosa 1989 and 1982 were my favorites.

With it we had Bistecca del Macellaio-Grilled Hanger Steak with Arugula, Parmigiano Reggiano DOP, Villa Manodori Aceto Balsamico, Extra Virgin Olive Oil, Sea Salt

Barolo DOCG Riserva 2010 made from 100% Nebbiolo The soil has a high concentration of limestone and gray marl alternating with sand. The vineyard is at 300 to 400 meters and the exposure is south/south-west. The training method is guyot. There are 4,400 plants per hectare and harvest is in the beginning of October. Traditional fermentation: 12 days in stainless steel vats with a floating cap at a controlled temperature. The must is in contact with the skins for 25 to 30 days. The wine is aged for 3 years in oak from Allier and Slavonia. The wine remains in the bottle for at least 24 month before release. The wine has hints of black cherry, mushrooms, nutmeg and balsamic aromas.

Barolo 2000 DOCG Riserva 2000 made from 100% Nebbiolo. Fermentation is for 15 days. The wine is aged for one year in barriques from Allier and 2 two years in 2,000 liter Allier oak casks. After a soft clarification the wine is bottled for at least 24 months before release.The wine has hints of black cherry, mushrooms, nutmeg and balsamic aromas. Chiara said this was the first single vineyard (cru) Barolo ever produced (1964).  There was some controversy over the 2000 vintage, some producers said it was too warm a vintage and others said it was a very good vintage.

Giorgio said that the winery is using fewer barriques than in the past and I am glad to see that they are returning to a more traditional style of winemaking.

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Barolo, Fantanafredda, Method Classico, Spumante

A Perfect Sicilian Lunch in NYC

Michele and I have a friend who loves everything Italian.  He studies the Italian language and has travelled to Italy many times, often with Michele and I. He loves real Italian food. Even though he lives in Montclair, NJ he will come to NYC for the food at Norma Gastronomia Siciliana. The food at this charming trattoria is prepared by chef/owner Salvatore Fraterrigo and is as authentically Sicilian as we have found anywhere outside of Sicily.

Our friend knows I like old Dolcetto and brought a 2007 to our recent lunch at Norma.

We started with the caponata, eggplant, onions, olives and capers in a sweet and sour tomato sauce.

Instead of bread I always order it with focaccia.  The crisp and chewy flatbread comes hot straight from the oven and it is a delicious combination with the caponata.

Dolcetto d’Alba 1985 Bruno Giacosa made from 100% Dolcetto. This wine was still drinking but was showing its age. The 1971, which I had on two different occasions, was fantastic.  1971 and 1985 were both very good years, so it was a problem of storage. As someone once said, “We do not drink great wines but great bottles.” Alcohol 12%

Then we had eggplant alla Parmigiana.  The chef’s version is made without breadcrumbs, making it lighter than most, and molded into a timballo.

We also ordered the meatballs, but we ate them before I could take a picture

The caponata and eggplant Piarmigiana were so good, that they made us crave more eggplant.  We all ordered the Pasta alla Norma, pasta tubes in a lightly spicy tomato sauce with fried eggplant cubes, topped with shredded ricotta salata and fresh basil.  We all agreed it was the best pasta we have had  in  a restaurant outside  of  Italy  in  a long  time.

Dolcetto di Dogliani “Briccolero” 2007 DOC Chionetti made from 100% Dolcetto. The soil is of a medium mix, calcareous, the training system is guyot and the exposure is southeast. Fermentation: soft-pressing, maceration with the skins for 15 days. Maturation: 85-90% in steel tanks for about 11 months and 10 to 15% for 11 months in 30HL oak casks. Chionetti is a great producer but the wine was not showing well. We had it decanted but it did not help. Our friend said he had the 2008 the night before and everyone said how good it was drinking.  Again, another case of  bottle variation.

It is interesting to note that the alcohol on the 1985 was 12% and on the 2007 14%.  Is this caused by global warming?

For dessert there were freshly made mini cannoli  garnished  with  pistachios.

and Almond Semifreddo with warm Chocolate Sauce

We ended with perfect espresso coffees – a fitting end to a perfect lunch.

Norma Gastronomia Siciliana– 438  3rd Avenue NY, NY- 212-889-0600

 

 

 

 

5 Comments

Filed under Dolcetto, Norma, Uncategorized

Tasting the Wines of Montefili in Magnum

 

I have tasted and drunk the wines of Vecchie Terre Di Montefilli both at I Trulli Restaurant and at the winery in Panzano,Tuscany. At I Trulli I tasted the wines with Nicola Marzovilla, owner of I Trulli, and a partner in the Montefili Winery. At the winery I tasted the wines with Serena Gusmeri, the winemaker. Last month Nicola invited me to taste the wines of Montefili again but this time from magnums. I thought it would be interesting to see how the wines were showing in magnum.

The Wines

Chanti Classico 2015 made from 100% Sangiovese from younger vines at 500 meters. The soil is galestro and alberese and the vineyard was planted in the late 1990’s. The training system is spurred cordon. Fermentation is in stainless steel with indigenous yeasts and the wine is aged for 18 months in 30HL Slavonian oak barrels. The wine remains in bottle for 6 months before release. The wine has hints of blackberry and cherry with a note of almond and a touch of violets.

Nicola said because 2015 was such a great vintage and needs many years to develop, they would hold back the 2015 vintage and release the 2016 which he said was more approachable. I tasted the 2016 at the winery and I agree with Nicola.

Chianti Classico Riserva DOCG 2015 made from 100% Sangiovese from a careful selection of grapes from vineyards with the best exposure. The vineyards were planted in the late 1980’s. The training system is spurred cordon and guyot. Fermentation is in stainless steel tanks with indigenous yeast. Aging is in Slavonian oak barrels of 3,000 and 2,000 liters for a minimum of 22 months and 6 months in bottle before release. This is a well-structured wine with hints of blackberry and cherry with a touch of violets and a note of almonds.

Vigna Vecchia “Grand Selezione” DOCG 2015 made from 100% Sangiovese from a single vineyard called Vigna Vecchia planted in 1981. The training system is spurred cordon and fermentation is in stainless steel tanks with indigenous yeasts. The wine is rotated between 30HL and 10HL oak barrels for 26 months and 8 months in bottle before release.  This is an elegant wine with red and black fruit aromas and hints of blueberries and cherries and a hint of violets.

Anfiteatro IGT 2012 made from 100% Sangiovese from the Anfiteatro vineyard planted in 1975. Nicola said this is their best vineyard. The training system is bilateral cordon. Fermentation is in stainless steel with indigenous yeast. The wine is aged for 28 months in 5HL barrels and 10 HL barrels and a minimum of 12 months in bottle before release. This is a very big wine that needs more time. In fact of all of the wines from the excellent 2015 vintage, this one will last the longest. Nicola said because of the position of the vineyards and because they are at 500 meters the microclimate is not like any other in Tuscany. The wine has hints of ripe red fruit, cherry, and cranberries with a note of violets and a touch of camphor. This wine was produced before Nicola and his partners bought the winery. This is a big wine and will need a lot of time to develop and the magnum will last for a very long time.

Bruno di Rocca IGT Colli Toscana 2004 made from 80% Cabernet Sauvignon and 20% Sangiovese from vineyards planted in the early 1980’s. The soil is galestro and the training system is spurred cordon. Vinification is in stainless steel tanks with indigenous yeast. Aging for a minimum of months 28 in tonneaux for the Sangiovese and for the Cabernet Sauvignon in barriques (350 liters).  Nicola said Cabernet Sauvignon needs to be aged in barriques. The wine spends a minimum of 12 months in bottle before release. It is difficult to make this type wine where the Cabernet Sauvignon does not dominate but this is a soft elegant wine. This wine was made before Nicola and his partners purchased the winery. It was showing no signs of age and was drinking very nicely.

 

 

 

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Chianti Classico, Chianti Classico Gran Selectione, Montefili, Uncategorized

A Taste of Irpinia

I did not think it was possible to fit in so much into two and a half days in Irpinia in Campania but we did. This is third blog on my trip.  In addition the the wines, it was an opportunity to sample the foods of this region, which although close to Naples and the Amalfi Coast, is quite different due to the climate and high altitude.

Our host for the trip was Federico Basso from the Villa Raiana winery.

The first night over dinner at Villa Raiana, Federico and I began to talk about pasta. I mentioned pasta aglio, olio e peperoncino which I had not had in a long time.  My wife, Michele makes it at home, but it is rare to see it on menus.  Federico said it is a simple dish but there must be a perfect balance between the ingredients to make it work and this is the difficulty. He mentioned that it is a specialty of the restaurant we are going for lunch the next day.

Restaurant Riserva 24 in located in Serino (Avellino)

When we arrived at the restaurant, there was a bowl of roasted chestnuts on the table. I tried one and the whole shell came right off.  It was  delicious, probably the best I had ever eaten. I had to stop myself from eating too many.

Appetizers

Sausage and  greens  with  potatoes,  fried  croutons  and  a fried  sweet  pepper.

Chick pea soup

 

Sauteed mushrooms with polenta

Pizza with lardo and local cheese

Greco de Tufo 2017 “Ponte dei SantiVilla Raiano. Federico said Greco di Tufo is a small appellation but has numerous shades in terms of terroir. In the upper section of the district of Ponte dei Santi of Altavilla, Irpina (Avellino) is their small 1.3 hectare vineyard. The vineyard is at 550 meters. There are 4,500 vines per hectare; the soil is sandy-silty with dark clay incursions. Harvest is the first week of October. Fermentation and aging the same as above.

Pasta aglio, olio and peperoncino

Irpinia Campi Taurasi 2015 made from 100% Taurasi “Costa Baiano” Villa Raiano Taurasi from a single plot shaped like an amphitheater in the central part of a 9 hectare vineyard located in the municipality of Castelfranci (Avellino) at 500 meters. There are 4,500 plants per hectare, the soil is calcareous clay on yellow sandstone with organic elements and the training system is guyot. Harvest is the first 10 days of November. Fermentation is in stainless steel tanks with daily punching down and pumping over. Maceration on the skins is for 10 days. The wine matures 50% in cement tanks and 50% in terracotta amphorae. The wine is bottled in October following the harvest. This was the first time I have tasted Taurasi aged in cement and amphorae. It has all the characteristics of Taurasi but seemed to be a much lighter style and more approachable. The 2015 was drinking very well and I believe it will mature slower than the 2016 we had at the winery.

Handmade fusilli pasta with tomato sauce

Grilled lamb and chicken

Dessert consisted of cookies and sweets typical of the holiday season.

That night we went to Restaurant Zi Pasqualina in Atripalda (Avellino)

The waiter suggested a few appetizers including:

Mozzarella di bufala Campania, ricottina di buffalo.

a

Crostini with peppers

Local prosciutto

 

I had the ravioli di ricotta in salsa di noci e ricotta salata di Montella

Michelle Kwan had candele pasta al ragu antico con pecorino di Lioni

Second course I had salsiccia di maiale alla brace

Michelle had bistecca di maiale alla brace.

We also shared patate e peperoni ripassati in padella

The restaurant has an extensive list of wines from Campania including older wines. They are in the same town as the Mastroberardino Winery and have Taurasi wines from Mastroberardino going back to the legendary 1968.

Michelle Kwan wanted to drink an older white wine, so we ordered a 2003 Greco di Tufo made from 100% Greco di Tufo Pietracupa. This winery has 3 hectares of vineyards. The soil contains a thin layer of clay and sand over a core of  tufa, a rock formed from volcanic ash. The wine has hints of lemon, pear, honey, white peaches and a touch of almonds.

In addition to being introduced to some memorable wines, this trip  it a great lesson in the culinary riches of Irpinia.

 

1 Comment

Filed under Greco di Tufo, Irpinia, Taurasi, Uncategorized, Villa Raiano

In Praise of Old Dolcetto

Recently on Facebook I posted pictures of a number of wines that are not supposed to age. They were all Dolcetto and all from the 1970’s.

There were many comments: “You must like geriatric wines,” “prove to me they are not corked,” and “you’re adventurous.”  Some expressed complete disbelief and a few actually agreed with me.  Here are the wines with my comments.

 

Dolcetto D’Alba 1971 Bruno Giacosa This was amazing — a Dolcetto almost 50 years old. It was in very good condition with subtle hints of red and black fruit. I had this wine for Thanksgiving-2019  and  these  comments  were  from  my  blog  post.

I had another bottle on January 2 and it was still amazing.

Dolcetto Cru Nassone La Morra 1971 made from 100% Dolcetto Marcarini/ Cogno  I do not believe this label is used anymore. Back in 1971 the wine would have been aged in concrete or large oak barrels (botte).  They did not have stainless steel tanks or barriques back then. For me this was a delightful surprise. The wine had hints of red fruit and black cherry with a touch of violets and almonds. It was showing no signs of age. Fantastic! From a blog dated September, 30 2019.

Dolcetto delle Langhe “Vigneto Sinaglio” 1979 Ceretto- This I had between Christmas and New Years and It was showing very well.

Dlocetto d’Alba 1970 Riccardo Ceretto –  light pink in color, it had fallen apart and was undrinkable and tasted like vinegar.

The most common problem with old wines is that they are oxidized, damaged by heat (maderized), cooked or fall apart and taste like vinegar. These problems are often caused by poor storage.  A corked wine is corked from the time the cork is put into the bottle at the  winery so if that is the case age does not matter.

Even wines made from grapes that are supposed to age well have this problem of storage. The conditions under which a wine is stored is very important. Old wines being held longer in storage and sometimes moved from place to place and even from owner to owner have a much better change of of spoilage.

When you buy old wines even from grapes that are supposed to age well, you are taking a chance.  Make sure when buying older wines that your retailer has a return or exchange policy if the wines are bad.  It’s worth taking a chance, however, and I had an opportunity to drink three wonderful wines, one twice.

 

 

 

 

3 Comments

Filed under Dolcetto, Uncategorized

Tasting Wine and Olive Oil at Villa Raiano

After enjoying some of the wines of Villa Raiano at dinner in their restaurant I was looking forward to tasting more of them the  next  morning at the winery.

Once again Federico Basso and his cousin Brunella Basso were there to welcome us. Federico showed us around the winery and then he conducted a very interesting and informative tasting of the wines.

There was one white from the 2018 vintage, 4 whites from the 2017 vintage, and a red aged in concrete and amphora.

Fiano di Avellino 2018 made from 100% Fiano DOCG-DOP from vineyards located at I Candida (450 meters), Lapio (500 meters), San Michele di Serino (500 meters) and Montefredane (450 meters). The training system is guyot and there are 4,500 vines per hectare. The soil is calcareous- clay, marly clay and sandy silty. Harvest is by hand the first week of October. After a gentle crushing of whole bunches to get free run juice, fermentation takes place with inoculated selected yeasts in stainless steel tanks and aging is in stainless steel tanks. The wine is bottled the second week of February following the harvest.

Federico explained that this was one of the wines in the Classics Line. They are a tribute to the land and the term “Classic” is used because according to the production tradition here in Irpinia, it was common to produce wines with grapes coming from vines located in different municipalities of the different production areas. They look for the most suitable balance, combining grapes from vineyard positions in different areas. The wine has hints of citrus fruit, apple, white flowers and a nice finish and long aftertaste.

Michele Kwan, a member of the Wine Media was on the trip with me and asked if the Classsic line was their “entry level wines”. While Federico was thinking I said these wines were too good to be called “entry level wines” and Federico agreed.

The following white wines Federico called “the vines” made from single vineyards or plots.

Federico showed us the different soils that the white wines come from and spoke about the importance of terroir.

Fiano di Avellino 2017 “Alimata” made from 100% Fiano–the night before with dinner we tasted the 2013 and it was excellent.

Fiano di Avellino 2017 “Ventidue” made from 100% Fiano. Federico said this wine is called Ventidue because 22 Km is the distance between the vineyard in Lapio and the winery. The vineyard is at 540 meters, the soil is calcareous-clay, rich in tallow sandstone. The training system is guyot and there are 4,500 vines per hectare. There is a gentle crushing of whole bunches and fermentation with selected yeasts in stainless steel tanks. The wine remains on the lees for 12 months in stainless steel and in bottle for 12 months before release in October of the year following the harvest.

Federico said in 2017 the weather was very hot though not as hot as 2003 but drier, and there was very little rain. Production was down 38%.

Fiano di Avellino 2017 “Bosco Satrano” made from 100% Fiano from vineyards that over look the winery in the municipality of San Michele di Serino in the province of Avellino in Contrada Bosco Satrano. The 4,400 vines were planted in 2009 and cultivated with the principles of organic farming, guyot trained, with calcareous soils at 510 meters. The vineyard faces northwest, facing Monte Partenio. Fermentation and aging same as above.

When we had the Fiano with dinner the night before, Federico said his Fiano has the aroma of an apple the grows on Mount Tubenna. I was able to smell the apple in a restaurant and all of the Fiano I tasted here really does have that  aroma.

Greco di Tufo 2017 “Ponte Dei Santi” 100% Greco. Federico said Greco di Tufo is a small appellation but has numerous shades in terms of terroir. In the upper section of the district of Ponte dei Santi of Altavilla Irpina (Avellino) is their small 1.3 hectare vineyard. The vineyard is at 550 meters. There are 4,500 vines per hectare, the soil is sandy-silty with dark clay incursions. Harvest is the first week of October. Fermentation and aging same as above.

Both Fiano and Greco can age for 15 years or more. I gave the slight edge to Greco but Federico said it was Fiano that he believed could age longer.

The main difference between Fiano and Greco is the Fiano has an apple aroma and hints of hazelnuts. Greco has more body, takes on a slightly honey quality with age and has hints of hazelnuts.

Costa Biano Irpinia Campi Taurasi DOC 2016 100% Taurasi from a single plot shaped like an amphitheater in the central part of a 9 hectare vineyard located in the municipality of Castelfranci (Avellino) at 500 meters. There are 4,500 plants per hectare, the soil is calcareous clay on yellow sandstone with organic elements and the training system is guyot. Harvest is the first 10 days of November. Fermentation is in stainless steel tanks with daily punching down and pumping over. Maceration on the skins is for 10 days.

The wine matures 50% in cement tanks and 50% in terracotta amphorae. The wine is bottled in October following the harvest. This was the first time I have tasted Taurasi aged in cement and amphorae. It has all the characteristics of Taurasi but seemed to be a much lighter style and more approachable. I liked it.

Olive Oil Tasting tasting with Federico.

  Olio Extra Vergine di Oliva “Sabino Basso” Monocultivar Ravece made mostly from Ravece olives grown almost exclusively in the province of Avellino.  It has a green color and a more or less intense olive aroma with hints of herbs, bitter spice, green tomato leaves and artichokes.

Olio Extra Vergine Di Oliva “Sabino Basso” DOP Penisola Sorrentino” mostly made from Minucciola olives. The oil is a straw yellow color with a delicate fruit flavor, hints of rosemary, mint, and aromatic herbs, with a touch of bitter spice, and a note of lemons typical of the Sorrentino Peninsula.

Federico at the Temple of Neptune

On the last day we went to the ancient Greek Temples at Paestum.

There are three temples on the site: Temple of Hera, Temple of Neptune and the Temple of Athena. The guide at the site said that the temples are also known by different names.  We also visited the National Museum at the site. I really enjoyed the visit to the site and to the museum as it helps you the understand the culture and history of the region.

After visiting the temples we went to Caseificio Vannulo, a farm that has 600 water buffaloes that produce milk for mozzarella, yogurt, ice cream ricotta, etc., which are all for sale.  There is a restaurant, museum and leather shop. I first visited Vannulo 12 years ago and it was not so “modern.”  Even through it was only a two and a half day trip I had a wonderful time thanks to the people at Villa Raiano

 

 

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Avellino, Fiano di Avellino, Greco di Tufo, Olive oli, Taurasi, Uncategorized, Villa Raiano