Summer Best of $20 and Under

 

 

No need to spend more than $20 a bottle for good wines like these. Here are the bottles I will be drinking all summer long.

Beneventano Falanghina IGT 2018 DonnaChiara made from 100% Falanghina The vineyard is the Torre Cuso, the best location for Falanghina. The soil is volcanic, chalky clay, the vines are 16 years old, the training system is guyot and there are 2,500 vines per hectare. The grapes are not destemmed or crushed before pressing. Cold fermentation is in stainless steel and there is extended maceration. This is a crisp white wine with citrus fruit aromas and flavors, nice acidity and good minerality. This is one of my favorite white wines and I always have a bottle or two on hand. $16.

Fiano di Avelllino 2017 Sarno 1860 made from 100% Fiano di Avellino. The vineyard is 8 hectares, the exposure is southeast and the training system is guyot. There are 5,500 plants per hectare and the harvest takes place the first two weeks in October by hand. Vinification is in steel at a controlled temperature with indigenous yeasts. The wine is aged for 8 months on the fine lees and four months in bottle before release. This is a wine with hints of citrus fruit, grapefruit, peach and toasted hazelnuts. They only produce Fiano di Avellino. $18

Fiano di Avellino “Radici 2017 ”  DOCG Mastroberardino made from 100% Fiano di Avellino from the 25 acre Santo del Sole vineyard at 1,815 feet with southwest exposure. The soil is sandy-loam. There are 1,600 vines per acre and the training system is guyot. The vineyard was planted in 2001. Harvest takes place the second half of October. Classic white wine vinification in temperature controlled stainless steel tanks. The wine remains in the bottle for 3 to 4 months before release. The wine has hints of pear, citrus fruit, a hint of pineapple and a touch of almonds. $18

Greco di Tufo 2017 DOCG Petilia made from 100% Greco. The vineyard is at 600 meters and the exposure is south/east. The soil is clay, volcanic, rich in minerals with a sulfurous sub soil. There are 4,000 vines per hectare and the training system is espalier with guyot pruning. The grapes are hand picked the second week of October. There is a soft pressing of the whole grapes and fermentation takes place in stainless steel vats at a controlled temperature. The wine remains in the bottle for 3 to 4 months before release. This is a well-structured and complex wine with hints of citrus fruit, lemon/lime, acacia and quince, a touch of minerality, good acidity and a very pleasing finish and long aftertaste. Greco di Tufo is a wine the can last for 20 years or more. Two weeks ago I had the 2009 and it was wonderful. $19

KATÁ IGP Catalanesca Del Mount Somma 100% Catalanesca. Cantine Olivella The grapes are carefully selected and hand harvested in the first half of October.  Fermentation and maturation is with natural yeast and takes place in temperature controlled stainless steel tanks. The refining process “sur lie” (lees contact starts in stainless steel and ends in the bottle after a three month period. The wine has very nice citrus aromas and flavors, with hints of apricot, cantaloupe and acidity. There is a mineral aspect to the wine, which may come from the volcanic soil. $18

Catalanesca 2018 IGP Tenuta Augustea made from 100% Catalanesca from the Somma Vesuviana zone. The soil is well-structured deep limestone with medium fertile consistency. The exposure is south/east and the vineyards are at 400/500 meters. The average age of the vines is 9/10 years and the training system is guyot. Harvest takes place in October. Fermentation is in steel tanks for 30 days at 18C. There is tartaric stabilization and filtration. This is an aromatic wine with hints of citrus fruit, apricot, a note of white flowers and good minerality.  $19

Pallagrello Bianco “Caiati” 2017 Michele Alois 100% Pallagrello Bianco from a 2.13-hectare vineyard at 280 meters, soil is volcanic with minerals. The training system is guyot, there are 4,800 plants per hectare and the harvest is in the middle of September. Fermentation takes place on the lees for 30 days. Malolactic fermentation is in stainless steel at a controlled temperature. The wine remains in the bottle for 4 months before release. The wine has hints of almonds, citrus fruit, melon and grapefruit with a long finish and pleasing aftertaste. $18

Umbria IGT Bianco Grechetto 2018  Argillae made from 100% Grechetto. The training system is guyot, there are 4,000 vines per hectare and the harvest takes place in September. After a careful selection in the vineyards, cold maceration takes place. There is a brief pressing and the juice is racked and fermented in stainless steel tanks at a controlled temperature. The wine remains on the lees in stainless steel tanks before it is bottled in February/March. The wine has hints of citrus fruit, a touch of jasmine, good acidity and a typical almond finish. I tasted this wine with a group of friends at the winery and they all really liked it. $18

La Lupinella Trebbiano Toscana IGT 2018 made from 100% Trebbiano. The vineyard is in Sant’Ansano (Vinci). The grapes are carefully selected by hand and a small part, about 2%, is picked from the bunches, set aside and later added during fermentation which takes place in terracotta jars, to intensify the aromatic character of the wine. The wine remains on the lees for a minimum of 6 months without undergoing malolactic fermentation and is aged at least 3 months in the bottle before release. This is a fresh fruity well-balanced wine with hints of peach, white flowers and a touch of almonds. $16

Soave Doc “Scaligeri” 2017 Sandro de Bruno made from 100% Garganega from small plots of land located on the slopes of Monte Calvarina. The vineyard is at 4,000 meters and the average age of the vineyards is 20 years. The training system is Pergoletta Veronese and the exposure is south. The soil is volcanic. There is manual harvesting using crates, grape sorting, de-stemming, grape selection, then a slow crushing of the grapes and pressing with nitrogen saturation. Fermentation takes place in stainless steel. This is a wine with hints of pear, figs, and almonds with good minerality. $17

Irpinia Rosato DOC 2018 “Vela Vento Vulcano” made from 100% Aglanico Tenuta Cavalier Pepe. The estate vineyards are in the hills of Luogosano and Sant’Angelo all’Esca at 350 meters. The soil is claylike and chalky. The grapes are hand picked, destemmed and undergo an initial cold maceration. After a few hours of skin contact, the grapes are pressed and the must ferments at a low temperature. The wine matures in bottle until release. This is an easy drinking fruity wine with hints of cherries, strawberries and a touch of raspberries. I visited the winery in February and was very impressed with all of the wines.$18

 

 

 

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Celebrating a Special Friends Birthday

To celebrate a friend’s birthday, and aware that he had been as diligent in social distancing, mask wearing and hand washing as we have been, Michele and I decided to prepare a special lunch for him.  The wine was provided by our friend

We started  with  a glass  of  Champagne  on  our  terrace,  which  is  currently under  construction  but  accessible.  

Champagne 2013 Pinot Meunier Grand Cru La Grande Vigne Vielles Vignes Extra Brut Suenen made from 100% Pinot Meunier from 50 year old ungrafted vines in Montigny-sur-Vesle The exposure is north west and the soil is sand and limestone. Oak barrels and turns are used for the wine making process. Also the use of an ovoid (egg shaped) concrete tun. There is spontaneous fermentation and natural malolactic fermentation and no filtration. The wine remains on the lees from 6 to 8 months. This is a very impressive bold Champagne, with hints of red fruit, brioche and honey.

Then we had pasta with lamb ragu. Michele  made  the  ragu  with  trimmings  from  a leg  of  lamb,  red  wine,  rosemary  and  the  usual  seasoning  vegetables.  The  pasta  was  mezze  maniche  by  Campofilone.

To follow we had butterflied leg of lamb seasoned with garlic and rosemary.  It was perfectly cooked, rare and juicy.

Leg of lamb with fresh  spinach  from  the  Greenmarket  and  alubia  blanca  beans from  Rancho  Gordo.

Montepulciano d’Abruzzo 1982 Emidio Pepe 100% Montepulciano d’Abruzzo. The winery is organic and Bio-Dynamic. They belong to the Triple “A” Agriculture Artisans Artists. Both the tendonne method and the cordon spur method are used for training the vines. In vintages when the weather is very hot the tendone method is better because the leaves form a canopy to protect the grapes from the sun.  When the weather is not too hot, the cordon spur is better because it allows more sun and air to reach the grapes. 1 hectare of tendone has 900 vines and produces 90 quintals of grapes.  That means that each vine produces from 6 to 9 kilos of grapes. In one hectare of cordon spur trained grapes, there are 3,300 vines and each vine produces 5 to 6 kilos of grapes. The grapes are crushed by hand and the juice placed in glass lined cement tanks of 20/25 liters. Only natural yeasts are used, there is no filtration or fining. The wine is transferred to the bottle by hand and the corks are placed in the bottles by hand. The wine has deep red fruit aromas and flavors with hints of cherry, spice and leather. It is one of my favorite red wines and was just wonderful. It was the perfect wine  to go with the pasta and the lamb.

Dessert was a Ricotta Raspberry Cake with fresh berries and creme fraiche whipped cream.

 

 

 

 

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Once upon a Time:1971 by Daniele Cernilli

The following article is very interesting to me because of all the 1971’s Daniele Cernilli mentions, the only one I did not drink in the 1971 vintage was the Sassicaia.  I agree with his assessment of the 1971 vintage and what it did for Italian wine.

By Daniele Cernilli (aka Doctor Wine)

Aside from being an excellent vintage, 1971 was a watershed year for producers who became convinced they could make great wine in Italy on the level of those in France.

“Not bad this Nebbiolo, Gino”, “You fool, this is not a Nebbiolo, it is a Barbaresco Santo Stefano di Neive Riserva 1971 from Bruno Giacosa!” This exchange, which for me was a scolding, took place during the dinner for the Risit d’Aur, an award created at the start of the 1980s by the Nonino family. Gino was Luigi Veronelli and I was taking my first, insecure baby steps in the wine world.

But what is more important is that the wine in question was a 1971, an historic year for Italian winemaking. It was a magnificent harvest throughout Italy, especially for Piedmont and Tuscany, although the south also produced some legendary reds, like the very great Taurasi Riserva Mastroberardino. The year produced the great Brunello Riserva wines of Biondi Santi, Barbi Colombini and Costanti. There were the formidable Barolo like Monfortino, Brunate Cogno Marcarini, Monfalletto Cordero di Montezemolo and the one from Bartolo Mascarello. Then, obviously, there were the Barbaresco from Giacosa, the Rabajà of Prunotto and Sori fromGaja, Amarone Bertani, Gattinara Travaglini and many, many others. This was also the vintage that probably established the reputation of Sassicaia. And it saw the debut of Tignanello, which came out that year with the label of Silvio Coppola as a “table wine”. Cabernet Sauvignon was not part of the blend at the time and although it was made with Sangiovese and Canaiolo, it could not qualify as a Chianti Classico because the blend did not include white grapes that the regulations of the era demanded. Tignanello was also the first “modern” wine in that, aside from its origin, the vineyard of the same name in Mercatale, it was also the product of a project that also included design and marketing. And it also marked the beginning of a winning trend that continues to this day.

But what really makes 1971 so special is that, aside from being a spectacular harvest that produced many outstanding wines, this year was a watershed one that led to an important realization in the world of wine. And this was that Italy, too, could produce wines that, in regard to quality and reliability, were on the same level as the great French ones, not just those of Bordeaux but also Burgundy, even if they were not as well-known at time.

Furthermore, a community of wine lovers was forming in Italy that, thanks to the first courses offered by the sommelier groups Ais and Onav, was becoming technically proficient. The great reds of 1971, of course, did not come out until between 1975 and ’78 but if many producers began to realize that they could turn out higher quality wines that could fetch a higher price, this was also because the Italian wine world began to feel the great winds of change that society was experiencing.  


 

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Once upon a Time:1971 by Daniele Cernilli

 

The following article is very interesting to me because of all the 1971’s Daniele Cernilli mentions, the only one I did not drink in the 1971 vintage was the Sassicaia.  I agree with his assessment of the 1971 vintage and what it did for Italian wine.

Aside from being an excellent vintage, 1971 was a watershed year for producers who became convinced they could make great wine in Italy on the level of those in France.

“Not bad this Nebbiolo, Gino”, “You fool, this is not a Nebbiolo, it is a Barbaresco Santo Stefano di Neive Riserva 1971 from Bruno Giacosa!” This exchange, which for me was a scolding, took place during the dinner for the Risit d’Aur, an award created at the start of the 1980s by the Nonino family. Gino was Luigi Veronelli and I was taking my first, insecure baby steps in the wine world.

But what is more important is that the wine in question was a 1971, an historic year for Italian winemaking. It was a magnificent harvest throughout Italy, especially for Piedmont and Tuscany, although the south also produced some legendary reds, like the very great Taurasi Riserva Mastroberardino. The year produced the great Brunello Riserva wines of Biondi Santi, Barbi Colombini and Costanti. There were the formidable Barolo like Monfortino, Brunate Cogno Marcarini, Monfalletto Cordero di Montezemolo and the one from Bartolo Mascarello. Then, obviously, there were the Barbaresco from Giacosa, the Rabajà of Prunotto and Sori from Gaja, Amarone Bertani, Gattinara Travaglini and many, many others. This was also the vintage that probably established the reputation of Sassicaia. And it saw the debut of Tignanello, which came out that year with the label of Silvio Coppola as a “table wine”. Cabernet Sauvignon was not part of the blend at the time and although it was made with Sangiovese and Canaiolo, it could not qualify as a Chianti Classico because the blend did not include white grapes that the regulations of the era demanded. Tignanello was also the first “modern” wine in that, aside from its origin, the vineyard of the same name in Mercatale, it was also the product of a project that also included design and marketing. And it also marked the beginning of a winning trend that continues to this day.

But what really makes 1971 so special is that, aside from being a spectacular harvest that produced many outstanding wines, this year was a watershed one that led to an important realization in the world of wine. And this was that Italy, too, could produce wines that, in regard to quality and reliability, were on the same level as the great French ones, not just those of Bordeaux but also Burgundy, even if they were not as well-known at time.

Furthermore, a community of wine lovers was forming in Italy that, thanks to the first courses offered by the sommelier groups Ais and Onav, was becoming technically proficient. The great reds of 1971, of course, did not come out until between 1975 and ’78 but if many producers began to realize that they could turn out higher quality wines that could fetch a higher price, this was also because the Italian wine world began to feel the great winds of change that society was experiencing.  By Daniele Cernilli ( aka Doctor Wine)


 

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Greco di Tufo & Seafood

When I saw her in February in Italy, Teresa di Bruno of the Petilia winery gave me a bottle of her 2008 Greco di Tufo.  I put it aside thinking that I would save it for a special occasion. But this weekend, Michele said that she wanted to make risotto with shrimp and fried soft shell crabs.  “Which wine to you have to go with them?” she asked.  I decided this was the special occasion.

Risotto with shrimps in the pot

 

On the plate

I first met Teresa di Bruno of the Petilia winery at a lunch organized by Ilaria Petitto of the Donnachiara winery. The lunch was at restaurant Zia Pasqualina in Atripalda (AV).

Teresa told me that they have 20 hectares of vineyards located in Campofiorito in Altavilla Irpinia. The winery is a family affair and is run by her and her brother Roberto.

I tasted some of the wines of Petilia at the lunch and was very impressed by them. When we said goodbye, Teresa gave me a bottle of the 2009 Greco di Tufo to take home with me.

Greco di Tufo 2009 DOCG made from 100% Greco. The vineyard is at 600 meters and the exposure is south/east. The soil is clay, volcanic, rich in minerals with a sulfurous sub soil. There are 4,000 vines per hectare and the training system is espalier with guyot pruning. The grapes are hand picked the second week of October. There is a soft pressing of the whole grapes and fermentation takes place in stainless steel vats at a controlled temperature. The wine remains in the bottle for 3 to 4 months before release. This is a well-structured and complex wine with hints of citrus fruit, lemon/lime, acacia and quince, a touch of minerality, good acidity and a very pleasing finish and long aftertaste. Greco di Tufo is a wine the can last for 20 years and this wine was not showing any signs of age.

For more information about the Petilia winery see:

https://charlesscicolone.wordpress.com/2020/02/19/woman-in-wine-part-ii-teresa-bruno-of-petilia/

Soft shell crabs  ready  to  cook

Soft shell crabs,  coated  in  a light  batter  and  fried.  

Asparagus with Butter and Parmigiano-Reggiano

Crispy fried soft shell crabs

 

Dessert was an old fashioned Lemon Pudding Cake.  Here it is just baked.

 

Lemon Pudding Cake served with fresh raspberries

 

 

 

 

 

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Special Weekend of Food and Wine

For a special weekend, we had a two day celebration. Here are some of the dishes we enjoyed, though not at the same meal.

Appetizer

Mortadella chunks which went very well with cornichon pickles, olives and Tarallli

 

Pasta with sausage,  tomato  and  cauliflower.

 

Steak with duck fat roasted potatoes- on the platter

In the dish with fresh, locally grown spinach.

 

The Wine

Carema Riserva 1983 Cantina Produttori Nebbiolo di Carema made from 100% Nebbiolo from hillside vineyards up to 600 meters. The village of Carema is in a valley north west of Piedmonte and makes the boundary between Piedmont and the Aosta Valley.

The vines are planted on steep stone terraces that reflect the sun and maintain the heat of the day during the night. The vines are trained on pergola-like crossbeams locally named “topie,” onto which the vines are tied down firmly to keep them from being broken by the strong winds. These topie also allow for maximum exposure to the sun, helping to draw out the harvest for as long as possible, thereby taming the grapes’ high acids that would otherwise overwhelm the palate. The wines are 100% Nebbiolo from the local clones nebbiolo spanna, picutener, meaning “tender stem,” and pugnet, meaning “fist-like,” a reference to the compact shape of the bunches.

The wine is aged for a minimum of 3 years of which 18 months is in large oak or chestnut barrels. This is a well structured wine with hints of red fruit , spice, licorice, a hint of dried flowers and notes of cinnamon.

Dessert was almond cake with strawberries and cream, plus a little chocolate.

 The next day we had smoked salmon and Champagne

Champagne Krug Cuvèe 167EME it is a blend of 191 wines from 13 different years, the youngest is from 2011 and the oldes goest back to 1995. The final blend is 47% Pinot Noir 36 % Chardonnay and17% Meunier. It is aged for about 7 years before it is released. The Champagne has hints of dried and citrus fruit a touch of gingerbread, with hints of hazelnuts, and brioche. It is Michele’s favorite Champagne..

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ROME AND NAPLES — JOIN US TODAY LIVE

Image may contain: Charles Scicolone, closeup
CHARLES SCICOLONE
Today’s the day!  Michele and I will be chatting with Tom Hyland, award winning journalist and photographer, about our favorite restaurants, wine and food in Naples and Rome.  Join us and discover some old favorites and recent discoveries.
Be sure to register in advance for this webinar:
https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_PNLpv87DRb2eXlfjmHpBpA
Monday, May 4 – 5:00 Eastern

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

 

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A Tale of Two Lunches

Can one enjoy lunch with friends on the Internet? Michele and I have a friend, Ernie De Salvo who lives in  NJ that we travel with often. In fact, we were with him in Naples and Rome for a month in February and March. He is a wine collector and an excellent cook, so we decided that even though we can’t get together in person, we could enjoy lunch and conversation via the internet.

Appetizer

We began our lunch with an appetizer of Tuscan style chicken liver pate which we ate with crackers.  Michele made it with garlic, capers, anchovies, and herbs.  It was very savory and rich but unfortunately, I didn’t take a photo of it.  Too busy eating.

Main Course

Our main course was chicken in a mustard sauce which we enjoyed with some simple roasted asparagus.  The  asparagus  in  the  photo  are  in  a special  asparagus  serving  bowl that  we bought  many  years  ago  in  Florence.

Mustard Chicken, made with shallots, herbs, white wine and a delicious  mustard  we  bought  in  Burgundy  last  year.

To drink, Michele and I had:

Chinon “Les Picasses” 1985 (Loire) Olga Raffault” Made from 100% Cabernet Franc. The soil is limestone and clay. The mid slope vines are at least 50 years old and are worked organically and harvested by hand.

The fruit is destemmed and whole uncrushed berries are fermented with indigenous yeast in stainless steel tanks. Fermentation and maceration lasts for 25 to 30 days depending on the vintage. The wine is aged for 2 to 3 years in oak and chestnut foudres of 30 to 50 HL. There is more aging in tank and bottle before release for about four years. This is a full bodied, structured and complex wine with hints of cherry, red and dark berries, a hint of smoke and a touch of meatiness

Ernie’s Lunch

While we enjoyed the above, Ernie was having the following:

For an antipasto, Parmigiano Reggiano, Finocchiona (fennel flavored salami) fatto in casa di Rosario, Pane e Olio.

This pasta is our friend’s personal concoction of traditional orecchiette, broccoli rabe, with garlic of course, combined with plenty of fried ground pork sausage meat. When it is all combined with a touch of peperoncino and plenty of grated Pecorino Romano, this pasta is to die for. The  last  are  his  words.  He  promises  to  make  it  for  me  when  we  can  get  together  again..

Barolo “Cannubi” 1995 made from 100% Nebbiolo Prunotto  Good color, classic Barolo nose of leather, tobacco, still dark cherry fruit. Tannins resolved but enough present to allow for more age. Wine paired well with orecchiette, broccoli rabe and sausage with plenty of pecorino grattugiato.

Though we couldn’t share our meals and wine, it was fun talking, laughing, and sharing our concerns on this strange predicament that we are all in.  For now, our internet lunches will have to do.

 

 

 

 

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A Three Course Lunch with Wine

Every week since we have been staying in, Michele places an order for a grocery delivery.  If we are lucky, half of it arrives.  This Friday the delivery contained some treats.  There were Italian pork sausages, both sweet and hot, firm red bell peppers and a fresh mozzarella.  We decided to have a little appetizer of crostini topped with mozzarella and a little marinara followed by sausages roasted with onions, potatoes and red peppers.

While Michele cooked, we couldn’t help nibbling on the mozzarella. 

Then we had the mozzarella on toasted Italian bread with tomato sauce

The peppers, potatoes  and onion  were  all  red.

Here they are sliced and ready for the oven.   A  generous  drizzle  of  olive  oil  and  they  were  ready  for  the  oven.  The  sausages  went  in  about  15  minutes  later.  

On the platter.  The  vegetables  were  nice  and  brown  and  crusty.

On the plate

The Wine

Valpolicella Superiore DOC 2012 I Saltari made from 60% Corvina, 20% Rondinella,10% Croatina and 10% Corvinone. The grapes are grown in the Mezzane Valley in the region of the Veneto on terraced hillside vineyards in calcareous and alkaline soil. After a careful collection of the grapes, vivification takes place in temperature controlled stainless steel tanks. After racking, the wine is transferred to different size barrels for malolactic fermentation. For 12 to 14 months, the wine goes through regular racking and topping up of the barrels until blending. The wine is unfiltered.  It has hints of small berries like currants and blackberry with hints of tobacco and leather and a touch of cherry. $29. This winery also produces an excellent Amarone.

 

Dessert was simple:  my favorite ciambelline, made by Michele, red wine and fennel cookies with a good cup of espresso.

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Amalfi Style Calamari with a Local Wine

Michele and I have been staying home since our return from Rome on March 6th except for going food shopping and taking walks to the Greenmarket. There is really no place to go in NYC and it looks like it will be that way until the middle of May, at least. What can I write about? I cannot write about travel, visits to winemakers, restaurants,  wine tastings and eating and drinking with friends.

I will just have to write about what I am eating and drinking at home, one wine and one dish at a time.  Every day, Michele tells me what she is making and I match it with a wine.

THE FOOD

  1. Calamari with Tomatoes and Potatoes Amalfi Coast Style — We first had this at La Gavitella, a restaurant on the beach in Praiano, near Amalfi.  There it is called Totani e Patate, totani being a type of squid.  It’s a very simple dish and easy to make with local products.

We were able to get in an order of fresh squid from Agata & Valentina.  Michele cut the squid into rings.  Unfortunately, they sent us only the tubular bodies and not the tentacles, so we had to do without.  The  first  step was  to  saute  several  cloves  of  chopped  garlic  in  olive  oil  with  some  peperoncino.  Then  add  the  squid and saute  for  a minute  or  two.

Two big potatoes were peeled and cut into bite size cubes.  The parsley was chopped and ready to garnish the finished dish.

 

A can of Italian peeled cherry tomatoes was crushed and added to the squid with a cup of white wine and some salt.  Potatoes went in a little later and the whole thing simmered until the potatoes were tender and the sauce was thick. 

Here it is before the potatoes went in.

The  finished  dish. We  ate  it  with  lots  of  good  bread.

THE WINE

Tenuta Augustea is owned by the Nocerino family and has been for over 100 years. They have 7 hectares of vineyards located on Monte Somma where they grow Catalanesca, Caprettone, Piedirosso and Aglianico among others all native grapes. 

Catalanesca 2018 IGP Tenuta Augustea made from 100% Catalanesca from the Somma Vesuviana zone. The soil is well-strutted deep limestone with medium fertile consistency. The exposure is south/east and the vineyards are at 400/500 meters. The average age of the vines is 9/10 years and the training system is guyot. Harvest takes place in October. Fermentation is in steel tanks for 30 days at 18C. There is tartaric stabilization and filtration. This is an aromatic wine with hints of citrus fruit, apricot a note of white flowers an good minerality. It went very well with the calamari.

 

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