Taittinger Champagne, Calvisius Caviar and Jacques Torres: Christmas in July

The program read: Champagne Taittinger presents The Art of Celebrating The Holidays, Christmas in July.

IMG_0839 As soon as I arrived I was given a glass of Taittinger Champagne and bottles of Taittanger Champagne were everywhere. One room featured oysters, clams, shrimps and lobster to go with the Champagne.IMG_0855

It was shaping up as quite an event and the Taittinger Champagne and Calvisius Caviar seminar that I had signed up for was not going to start for another half hour.

Chantelle Pabros, Vitalie Taittinger and John Knierim

Chantelle Pabros, Vitalie Taittinger and John Knierim

The moderator for the seminar was Vitalie Taittinger, Aristic Director, Taittinger Champagne.IMG_0857

She said that Taittinger is one of the few remaining family owned and operated Champagne houses. It is located in Reims, France. Its distinctive style is influenced by a greater proportion of Chardonnay in the blends and a longer aging period before release. The panel members were Chantelle Pabros, Sommelier, and John J. Knierim from Calvisius Caviar.IMG_0856

John said that Calvisius is an Italian company located in Calvisano, between Milan and Venice. It is the world’s largest farmed caviar producer accounting for 20% of global caviar production from its 150 acres of sustainable aquaculture pools.IMG_0834

There were four champagnes matched with caviar. The Caviar was on small metal spoons next to each champagne. John said caviar should only be served using mother of pearl spoons because a metal spoon could change the taste. Since we only had metal spoons he suggested we put the caviar on the out side of our hand just below the thumb and taste it that way. IMG_0845

Champagne Taittinger Brut La Française NV made from 40% Chardonnay, 35% Pinot Noir and 25% Pinot Meunier. This is a champagne with aromas of peach, white flowers and brioche with fresh fruit and a touch of honey on the palate. $59.99

Paired with Calvisius Caviar Traditional Prestige. White Sturgeon (Acipenser Transmontanus) from the Pacific Coast of North America between Alaska and Baja California. The eggs are large, about 3 millimeters, color: dark gray to black. It requires about 11 years of the sturgeon life cycle. Delicate and elegant with hints of cream, butter and sea salt. 28 grams $74.99IMG_0846

Champagne Tattinger Prélude Grands Crus NV made from 50% Chardonnay and 50% Pinot Noir. Fresh citrus aromas and flavors with hints of white peach and a touch of cinnamon. $94.99

Paired with Oscietra Caviar Oscietra Classic (Acipenser Gueldenstaedii) Also known as Russian Sturgeon. it is an ancient species originally native to the Black Sea, Caspian Sea and the Azov Sea. Medium size eggs 2.6 to 2.9 millimeters. It requires a 12 to 13 year life cycle. It is a firm egg, dark brown in color with a golden hue. It has a rich nutty and creamy flavor with a hint of the sea. It was a perfect combination with the croissant and brioche aromas and flavors of the Champagne. 28 grams $ 119.99IMG_0847

Champagne Taittinger Comtes de Champagne Blanc de Blancs 2006 100% Chardonnay. This is a complex Champagne with hints of citrus fruit, lime blossom and a touch of grape fruit. $198.99

 Paired with Calvisius Caviar Siberian from Siberian Sturgeon (Acipenser Baerii) native to the fluvial basins of Siberia, from the Ob river to the Kolyma river and in the Baikal Lake. Its caviar has size that varies with age, 2.2 to 2.7 millimeters, in shades of grey and amber. It requires 6 to 8 years of the sturgeon life cycle. 28 grams\$ 261.99IMG_0848

Champagne Taittinger Comtes de Champagne Rosè 2006 Made from 30% Chardonnay and 70% Pinot Noir. Delicate bubbles, complex aromas of strawberries, cherries and black currants and a touch of almond on the finish. $261.99

Calvisius Caviar Oscietra Royal. Special selection of Oscietra that has large grains that are dark brown with shades of amber. The roe has a velvety firm texture evoking rounder and more balanced flavors than the Classic. It is rich and creamy with notes of butter, hazelnut and a touch of the sea. 28 grams $139.99

John said that in theory this should not have paired well but to him it was one of the best pairings and the other two panel members agreed.

j

Jacques Torres

On the way out I saw in another room Jacques Torres, the famous chocolate and confectionary maker.IMG_0861

I sampled all of the chocolates, the macaroons, the chocolate cookies and last but not least the chocolate caramel popcorn.

It was an evening to remember and I kept thinking why wait for the holidays to celebrate with Taittinger Champagne, Calvisus Caviar and Jacques Torres chocolates? it was all so wonderful on a summer evening in NYC.

For more information www.taittinger.fr and http://www.calvisius.com

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Tom Maresca on Beaujolais Crus for Summer

Some Fine Beaujolais Crus, Including Drouhin’s New Ones

Tom’s Wine Line  https://ubriaco.wordpress.com/

Nobody needs to be told that deep summer is Beaujolais weather. I’ve been enjoying some old favorites for two months now, and I’ve also had the pleasure of discovering Drouhin’s new selection of three excellent Beaujolais crus, a Brouilly, a Fleurie, and a Morgon.

For me, the cru wines of Beaujolais are the quintessence of Beaujolais. Call me a snob (I probably am), but I never drink Beaujolais Nouveau: When I want candy, I will walk over to Li-Lac Chocolates and get some good stuff, thank you. And I only occasionally drink simple Beaujolais, from the larger zone that surrounds the heartland of the 10 crus. More often, I opt for a Beaujolais Villages, a smaller, better zone, and then usually from a producer I know and respect, such as Roland Pignard. But most often, my Beaujolais of choice comes from one of the named and quite distinctive crus – Brouilly, Côte de Brouilly, Chénas, Chiroubles, Fleurie, Juliénas, Morgon, Moulin-à-Vent, Régnié, and Saint Amour.
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beaujolais map

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There are many excellent producers in these appellations, some quite small, some quite sizable. Probably the best known in this country – and certainly the most widely available – is Georges Duboeuf, who produces Beaujolais in every category from the simplest to the most rarefied. Obviously, he is a big producer, and a pretty good one, though I usually find his wines ho-hum: They just taste too industrial to me, too made-to-a-formula.

Among the big producers, I think Jadot does a better job: I like particularly its well-structured Château des Jacques Moulin-à-Vent. Indeed, I have strong memories of visiting this cru years ago, when the iconic windmill had just been restored and was set to turn again for the first time in many decades. Jadot, I believe, was a major supporter of the restoration, and most Beaujolais old-timers saw the event as a kind of rebirth for the whole zone. It may be just post hoc, but in fact the wines of all the Beaujolais crus have been steadily improving ever since.
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windmill

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Moulin-a-Vent is popularly supposed to be the longest-aging Beaujolais, and it is certainly true that in a good vintage it will age beautifully for sometimes up to 20 years – but so will Morgon and Chénas, and I’ve tasted (admittedly ideally stored) 20- and 30-year-old bottles from several other crus that drank beautifully, with an almost Burgundian grace. But ageworthiness is only an added attraction of a good Beaujolais: What really counts in all the crus are their youthful charm and exuberance, their lightness of touch and sheer refreshing enjoyability.

The bottles I like best almost always come from smaller growers who cultivate very particular terroirs and microclimates. They won’t all be available everywhere, but they are worth the trouble of seeking out. Just because a wine offers light and pleasurable warm-weather drinking doesn’t mean it has to be anything less than a real and interesting wine. Some really fine ones include Jean-Paul Brun’s Terres Dorées Côte de Brouilly, Julien Guillot’s Ultimatum Climat Chénas, and Coudert’s Clos de la Roillette Fleurie.

I have made no secret of my admiration of the house of Drouhin’s fine Burgundies, so I was more than a little interested to find that three Beaujolais crus have been added to its portfolio. The Brouilly, Fleurie, and Morgon are all grown and vinified in the Domaine des Hospices de Belleville properties – 34 acres in all – under an exclusive partnership agreement that gives the Hospice the advantage of Drouhin’s viticultural know-how and distribution while still retaining the concentration of the small grower’s familiarity with the vineyards and its commitment to them. I tasted three samples – all 2014 vintage – and found each classically true to its appellation.
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drouhins

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The Brouilly smelled of cherries and blackberries and tasted lightly of strawberry. It was characteristically dry and acidic, even a touch austere, with a long spice and leather finish – thoroughly enjoyable.

The Fleurie, a slightly bigger wine, showed scents of blackberry, earth, and black pepper. It was rounder in the mouth and less obviously acid, with dark berry flavors up front and a berry/pepper finish. Again, completely enjoyable, and a seemingly fine companion for any summer meal.

The Morgon, finally, was the biggest and most structured of the three, with an earthy, almost meaty nose with undertones of tar and bramble, an almost zinfandelish character (top quality zinfandel, to be sure). In the mouth, it was completely dry and sapid, rich with notes of blackberry, bramble, and earth, and with a long berry finish. Because of flavors like that, Morgon has always been one of my favorite Beaujolais crus, and this example instantly moved to the top of my short list.

All three will probably hold well, with no loss of youthful charm or vigor, for three to five years before any tastes of maturity set in – so, while these Beaujolais don’t need cellaring, you don’t have to fear putting a few of them away in a quiet corner for future enjoyment. If the stories I’ve heard about the horrific hailstorms in Fleurie this spring are half true, that may not be a bad idea.

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From Puglia: The Wines of Azienda Vinicola Cantele

Paolo Cantele is the brand manger for the Cantele Winery in Puglia. We have met several times in the past, most recently at a tasting organized by Radici del Sud 2016 in Puglia where I tasted his wines again. I liked them and decided it was time to write about them.

Paolo Cantele

Paolo Cantele

Paolo said the winery was founded in 1979 by Gianni Cantele and his sons Augusto and Domenico. The Cantele family now owns 50 acres of vineyards and manages/rents an additional 120 acres in the township of Guagnano in southern Puglia. Paolo said it is a family affair, his older brother, Gianni, is the winemaker and the other family members take part in running the winery.

The WinesIMG_0368

Chardonnay IGT Salento, the production area is Guagnano (LE) and Monternesola (TA) 100% Chardonnay.The training system is guyot and there are 5,000 plants per hectare. Harvest is the first ten days of August.

The grapes are destemmed, crushed and gently pressed. The must is cooled to 10C in order to allow for natural fining. Alcoholic fermentation is carried out in stainless steel vats at 15C. Paolo said the wine should be drunk young. It has fruity citrus flavors and aromas with a hint of juniper.IMG_0369

Amativo” IGT Salento, Production area is Guagnano (LE) ,Sava (TA) and San Pietro Vernotico (BR) made from 60% Primitivo and 40% Negroamaro. The vines are head- trained (alberello) and there are 5,000 plants per hectare. Primitivo is harvested in early September and the Negoramaro in late September. After being destemmed and crushed, the must is macerated with skin contact for 12/15 days during which délestage is employed on a daily basis. Fermentation is temperature controlled. After malolactic fermentation is completed, the wine is aged in barriques for about 12 months. Paolo said the wine can age for 4 to 6 years. The wine has nice fruit hints of dried figs, spice and a touch of vanilla.IMG_0367

Negroamaro Rosato IGT Salento , production area Guagnano (LE) 100% Negroamaro. The training system is spur-pruned cordon and there are 5,000 vines per hectare. Harvest takes place the second half of September. Paolo said the grapes are macerated for 12 to 24 hours in order to extract the correct color from the skins and the classic aromatic notes of Negroamaro. The free-run must is fermented at 14/15C in stainless-steel vats where it remains until alcoholic fermentation is completed. The wine is aged in stainless steel until it is bottled. This is a well-balanced fresh wine with hints of strawberry and cherry. Paolo said the wine should be consumed upon release or with in a year or two.IMG_0365

Salice Salentino Riserva DOC, production area Guagnano (LE). 100% Negroamaro. The vines are pruned-spur condon trained and there are 4,500 vines per hectare. Harvest takes place at the end of September. After being destemmed and crushed, the must is macerated with skin contact for about 10 days. Fermentation is carried out at 25/26C. Once malolactic fermentation is completed, the wine is aged 1 year in 2-year-old barriques and about 6 months in bottle before release. The wine has hints of candied fruit, spice, and tea and is well balanced. Paolo said the wine is ready to drink but will continue to evolve for 3 to 4 years.IMG_0366

Primitivo IGT Salento Production area: Sava (TA), Torricella (TA) and San Pierto Vernotico (BR) 100% Primitivo. Vines are head trained (alberello) and there are 4,500 plants per hectare. Harvest is in early September. After being destemmed and crushed, the must macerates with skin contact for 6/7 days. Fermentation is carried out at 25/26C. The wine is then aged for about 6 months in barriques. The wine is ready to drink but will continue to evolve for 3 /4 years. The wine has hints of sour cherry and prune with spicy notes.

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Tom Hyland on the Vietti Sale

The Vietti Sale -The Krause Viewpoint

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A Winery Named Ciù Ciù: Certified Organic and Vegan

When I was in Rome in February we went to Ar Galetto restaurant in the Piazza Farnese. It was warm enough to sit outside and Michele loves the view of the fountains and Palazzo Farnese, where much of the opera Tosca is set.

I ordered spaghetti with fresh anchovies. With it I ordered a wine with the unlikely name of Ciù Ciù (pronounced choo choo) made from the Pecorino grape from the region of the Marche. I had first enjoyed this wine in NYC at Ribalta Restaurant with Paolo Agostinelli who represents the winery. It was the perfect wine to go with the spaghetti.IMG_0759

This is what Paolo told me about the Società Agricola Ciù Ciù winery. It is family owned and run and was established in 1970 by Natalino Bartolomei and his wife Anna. Today the winery is run by their sons Massimliano and Walter.

In the beginning, the focus was on indigenous grapes: Trebbiano, Passerina, Pecorino, Montepulciano and Sangiovese. Later they expanded into the Verdicchio del Castelli di Jesi and the Lacrima di Morro d’Alba area. They also have some international grape varieties. The philosophy of the winery is that the best wine is made in the vineyard, not in the cellar.

The Ciù Ciù winery is certified organic and since the 2014 vintage, the wine is certified vegan. The winery is located in the middle of the Piceno hills, at Offida (Ascoli Piceno). It is in the Rosso Superiore production area and its vineyards extend over 150 hectares.

The White Wines

Passerina “Evoè” Marche IGP 2015 100% Passerina The vineyard is at 250 to 300 meters and the soil is of medium texture. They use the spur pruned training system and the hand harvest takes place at the end of September. This white wine is fermented at a controlled temperature in stainless steel and refining does not take place. It is any easy drinking aromatic wine with fresh citrus aromas and flavors and nice minerality. Paolo said it is ready to drink right after the harvest.IMG_0813

Pecorino “Mertettaie” Offida  2015 DOCG 100% Pecorino, the vineyard is at 280 meters, vines are spur pruned cordon trained and the soil is medium mixture and clayey. Harvest is the last ten days of September. Paolo said the wine  is cold macerated in stainless steel and then fermented in botti (25hl) with indigenous yeast. It is also aged in the same botti for 6 months  and 3 months in bottle before release. This is a dry white wine with good minerality, notes of citrus fruit and a touch of acacia.

Vino Spunamte Merlettaie Brute NV made from 100% Pecorino. Vineyard is at 280 meters, spur pruned cordon training and the soil is of medium mixture quite clayey. Harvest is by hand the first ten days of September. The decanted must is fermented with selected yeasts at controlled temperatures. The Charmat-Martinotti method is used, the sparkling process lasts for 25 days, refining with yeast for 5 months and 3 months in bottle before release. It has very fine bubbles with hints of citrus fruit, apple and almonds with mineral undertones.

The Red WineIMG_0812

Marche IGT Rosso 2011 “Oppîdum” made from 100% Montepulicano. The vineyard is at 300 meters, with medium mixture clayey soil, spur pruned cordon training and the harvest takes place at the end of October. Fermentation is on the skins for 20 days followed by malolactic fermentation. 30% of the wine is aged in barriques and 70% of the wine in 10 hl barrels for 12 months. The wine is in bottle for 6 months before release.IMG_0814

Rosso Piceno Superiore DOP 2013 “Gotico” Montepulciano 70% and Sangiovese 30%. The vineyard is at 300 meters, spur pruned cordon training, medium mixture soil and the harvest takes place the second half of October. Traditional red wine fermentation takes place with a cold drawing of the wine. Paolo said the wine is aged in botti. Depending on the vintages we use 25 to 35 hl botti and we keep the wine for 12 to 18 months. The 2013 vintage was aged for 18 months as the weather was really hot and we needed to soften the edges more.  This is a full-bodied wine with hints of black fruit, spice and a touch of vanilla.IMG_0811

 Offida DOC Rosso 2009 “Esperanto” Montepuliciano 70% and Cabernet Sauvignon 30%. The vineyard is at 300 meters, spur pruned cordon training, and medium mixture clayey soil. The harvest is by hand: the end of September for the Cabernet and the end of October for the Montepulciano. There is a long fermentation on the skins; a daily cold drawing of the wine both in stainless steel and barriques. Paolo said the wine  is aged in mid-toasted French oak barriques for two years and then bottled for 2 more years before going to the market.  This is a well-structured wine with hints of plums, cherries, a touch of spice and leather.

 

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Filed under CiuCIU, Italian Sparkling Wine, Italian White Wine, Italian Wine, Marche, Passerina, Pecorino, Rosso Piceno

Radici del Sud: Minutolo, Ciro and the List of Award Winning Wines

After I arrived in Puglia for Radici del Sud, I spent two nights traveling around the region and even stayed in a trullo, one of the cconical stone structures so typical of the region.IMG_0632

Then we returned to our original hotel outside of Bari where we were reunited with the wine buyer members of our group for another tasting called “Discover Ciro Wines from Calabria” where 4 producers show one wine each. All are imported into the USA. Ole Udsen, “Mr Puglia,” did the translation and added his comments on Ciro wines in general.IMG_0691

Cirò Rosso 2013 Classico Superiore ‘‘A Vita” made from 100% Gaglioppo from vines up to 45 years old. Grapes are destemmed and fermented in stainless steel using only ambient yeast and the wine is aged in stainless steel tanks. The winery is certified organic.

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Francesco de Franco from A Vita

The wine has hints of cherry, faded roses and tobacco with a very nice finish and aftertaste. IMG_0711

Cirò Rosso 2013 Classico Superiore Cataldo Calabretta 100 % Gaglioppo. The vines are bush trained and are 15 years old. The soil is clay and limestone and there are 5,000 plants per hectare. The harvest is by hand the third week of October. Fermentation is spontaneous with native yeasts and there is a two-week maceration without temperature control. The wine is aged for 10 months in glazed cement tanks. It remains in the bottle for 7 months before release. The estate is certified organic.IMG_0689

Ciro Rosso  2012 Classico Superiore  Scala, 100 % Gaglioppo. Soil is clay and sand and the exposure is south/southeast and the 10 year old vines are espalier trained. The grapes are destemmed and maceration takes place at 77°F until the fermentation is completed. After soft pressing, the wine is then racked and left in cement tanks for a minimum of 10 to 12 months. This is a robust wine with good red fruit and hints of sour cherry. IMG_0690

Ciro Rosso Classico Superiore 2012 Cote di Franze made from 100% Gaglioppo. The vineyard is at 250 meters, soil is clay and sandy, alberello (bush) trained. The vines were planted in 1977/1958/1980. There are 9,000 plants per hectare. The hand harvest takes place in October. Fermentation is spontaneous, maceration is in stainless steel and the wine is aged in stainless steel for 12/24 months depending on the vintage.IMG_0702

At the hotel there was a blind tasting over four sessions for the wine competition and the top wines were announced.  We were divided into four groups: two groups of buyers and two groups of press.IMG_0699

My group tasted over 200 hundred wines over two days in the four sessions. The wines were rated on a 100-point system.

Nicola Campanile and Ole Udsen "Mr Puglia"

Nicola Campanile and Ole Udsen “Mr Puglia”our Translator and Guide

Following is a quote by Nicola Campanile, organizer of the event, about the competition:

“The foreign buyers were part of two juries and expressed their judgment presumably giving particular attention to how appealing the wines can be to the market. Instead the journalists made up the other two groups and gave a more unconditional judgment. Buyers and journalists came from 13 foreign countries (Sweden, Finland, Norway, Denmark, Great Britain, Holland, USA, Canada, Japan, Lithuania, India, Poland and Brazil).”

The top rated wines were announced on the last night of the event.

Two wines from Di Meo, one of my favorite producers, were picked as # 1 in their categories by the journalists: Greco di Tufo 2015 and the Fiano Di Avellino 2015.

It is interesting to note that the journalists and buyers only agreed on  3 wines but if it was #1 for the journalists, it was #2 for the buyers and visa versa. See the complete list of winning wines at the end of the blog.

The last tasting was from the Tujiano Winery: from 2015 to 2010IMG_0716

Puglia IGP Fiano Minutolo Colli della Murgia. 100% Fiano Minutolo. The origin of this grape variety is not known. It does not have any relation to Fiano di Avellino or the Fiano grown in Puglia but the IGP has to have Fiano Minutolo on the label, it cannot just say Minutolo. The wine was dry with good citrus aromas and flavors.

Nicola

Nicola Campanile and Liciano Pignataro

The speakers were Nicole Campanile and Luciano Pignataro, a well known Italian wine and food blogger that I follow: www.lucianopignataro.it/

The Winning Wine from 2016 Radici del Sud Wine Competition

SPARKLING WINE (WHITE)

JOURNALISTS

1, CAPRETTONE, CASA SETARO

2, RISERVA NOBILE 2012, D’ARAPRÌ

BUYER

1, NOI DUE, TENUTA VIGLIONE

2, MACCONE SPUMANTE BIANCO BRUT, PUGLIA IGP, ANGIULI DONATO

ex aequo2 BUYER, TIATI METODO CLASSICO, PUGLIA IGP, CANTINE TEANUM

SPARKLING WINE (ROSE’)
JOURNALISTS

1, BRUT ROSÈ, D’ARAPRÌ

2, LEGGIARDO ROSATO, CONSORZIO PRODUTTORI VINI MANDURIA

ex aequo 2, DOVÌ ROSÈ, FERROCINTO

BUYER

1, LEGGIARDO ROSATO, CONSORZIO PRODUTTORI VINI MANDURIA

2 BUYER, LA VIE EN ROSE’, PUGLIA IGP, TENUTA COPPADORO

ex aequo 2, DOVÌ ROSÈ, FERROCINTO

FALANGHINA
JOURNALISTS

1, BENEVENTANO FALANGHINA IGP 2015, SANPAOLO

2, COSÌCOMÈ 2014, IGP PUGLIA, VALENTINA PASSALACQUA

BUYER

1, CRUNA DELAGO 2014, CAMPI FLEGREI DOC, LA SIBILLA

2, MAIOR 2012, FALANGHINA DEL SANNIO DOP, CANTINA FOSSO DEGLI ANGELI

CATARRATTO

JOURNALISTS

1, ANTISA CATARRATTO 2015, SICILIA DOC, TASCA D’ALMERITA

2, VIGNA CASALJ 2015, ALCAMO DOC, TENUTA RAPITALÀ

BUYER

1, TERRE ROSSE DI GIABBASCIO 2014, TERRE SICILIANE IGT, CENTOPASSI

2, ANTISA CATARRATTO 2015, SICILIA DOC, TASCA D’ALMERITA

GRILLO

GIORNALISTI

1, BLUES 2015, TERRE SICILIANE IGP, PAOLO CALÌ

2, GRILLO 2015, SICILIA DOC, FEUDO DISISA

BUYER

1, APOLLO 2014, TERRE SICILIANE IGP, FAUSTA MANSIO

2, ROCCE DI PIETRA LONGA 2014, TERRE SICILIANE IGT, CENTOPASSI 

GROUP OF MIXED WHITE WINES FROM LESS POPULAR SOUTH ITALIAN GRAPES JOURNALISTS

1, BIANCO DI SEI 2014, ETNA DOC, PALMENTO COSTANZO

2, BUCECI BIANCO 2015, TERRE SICILIANE IGT, BUCECI VINI

3, KORE 2015, TERRE SICILIANE IGT, CANTINE COLOMBA BIANCA

BUYER

1, STRIALE 2015, PUGLIA IGP, TENUTA PATRUNO PERNIOLA

2, MALVASIA BIANCA 2015, SALENTO IGP, CONTI ZECCA

3, BIANCO DI SEI 2014, ETNA DOC, PALMENTO COSTANZO

GRECO
JOURNALISTS

1, GRECO DI TUFO DOCG 2015, DI MEO

2, LE PAGLIE 2015, MATERA DOC, CANTINE CERROLONGO

BUYER

1, JENTILINO 2015, TERRE DI COSENZA DOP, LA PESCHIERA

2, GRECO DI TUFO DOCG 2015, SOCIETÀ AGRICOLA NATIV

FIANO
JOURNALISTS

1, FIANO DI AVELLINO DOCG 2015, DI MEO

2, BIANCOFIORE 2014, DAUNIA IGP, KANDEA

BUYER

1, TRENTENARE 2015, PAESTUM IGP, SAN SALVATORE 1988

2, TORRE DEL FALCO 2015, PUGLIA IGP, TORREVENTO

GROUP OF MIXED ROSE’ WINE SOUTH ITALIAN GRAPES

JOURNALISTS

1, CIRÒ DOC ROSATO 2015, SCALA CANTINA E VIGNETI

2, OSA! 2015, TERRE SICILIANE IGP, PAOLO CALÌ

3, LE ROTAIE 2015, VALLE D’ITRIA IGP, I PASTINI

BUYER

1, NAUSICA 2015, SALENTO IGP, CARDONE

2, NERO DI TROIA ROSÈ, ROSSO DI CERIGNOLA DOC, BIOCANTINA GIANNATTASIO

3, SPEZIALE 2015, SALENTO IGP, TRULLO DI PEZZA

 

NERO DI TROIA
JOURNALISTS

1, OTTAGONO 2013, CASTEL DEL MONTE DOCG, TORREVENTO

2, NERO DI TROIA 2014, PUGLIA IGP, VALENTINA PASSALACQUA

BUYER

1, GRAN TIATI GOLD VINTAGE 2010, PUGLIA IGP, CANTINE TEANUM

2, LUI 2012, PUGLIA IGP, CANTINA MUSEO ALBEA

NEGROAMARO
JOURNALISTS

1, COPERTINO ROSSO DOC RISERVA 2008, CUPERTINUM – ANTICA CANTINA DEL SALENTO 1935

2, DANZE DELLA CONTESSA 2014, NARDÒ DOC, CANTINA BONSEGNA

BUYER

1, VECCHIO SOGNO 2014, SALENTO IGP, TENUTA GIUSTINI

2, POSTA PIANA 2014            PUGLIA IGP, CANTINE PARADISO

ex aequo 2, NERÌO 2013, NARDÒ DOC, SCHOLA SARMENTI

PRIMITIVO

JOURNALISTS

1, PRIMITIVO 2013,PUGLIA IGP, PIETREGIOVANI

2, IL RACCOMANDATO 2014, PUGLIA IGP, FIORE AZIENDA AGRICOLA

BUYER

1, PAPALE LINEA ORO 2013, PRIMITIVO DI MANDURIA DOP, VARVAGLIONE VIGNE E VINI

2, PRIMITIVO DI MANDURIA DOP 2012, ANTICA MASSERIA JORCHE

NERO D’AVOLA
JOURNALISTS

1, CURMA 2010, SICILIA IGT, A R M O S A

2, VUARIA 2010, SICILIA IGT, FEUDO DISISA

BUYER

1, SANTA CECILIA 2011, NOTO DOC, PLANETA

2, VUARIA 2010, SICILIA IGT, FEUDO DISISA

GROUP OF MIXED RED WINES FROM LESS POPULAR SOUTH ITALIAN GRAPES

JOURNALISTS

1, TAURASI S.EUSTACHIO 2008, TAURASI DOCG, BOCCELLA

2, GHIAIA NERA 2013, SICILIA DOC, TASCA D’ALMERITA

3, DON VINCENZO 2013, LACRYMA CHRISTI DEL VESUVIO DOC ROSSO, CASA SETARO

BUYER

1, ERUZIONE 1614 2013, SICILIA DOC, PLANETA

2, LIBICI 2012, CALABRIA IGP, CASA COMERCI

ex aequo 2, TAURASI 2011, TAURASI DOCG, TENUTA SCUOTTO

3, BOCCA DI LUPO 2011, CASTEL DEL MONTE DOC, TORMARESCA

GAGLIOPPO
JOURNALISTS

1, CIRÒ RISERVA 2012, COTE DI FRANZE

2, DUCA SANFELICE 2013, CIRÒ RISERVA, LIBRANDI

BUYER

1, ARCANO RISERVA 2009, CIRÒ ROSSO CLAS. SUP. RISERVA, SENATORE VINI

2, DOM GIUVÀ 2013, CIRÒ ROSSO CLASSICO SUPERIORE DOC, DU CROPIO VINERY

ex aequo2, JACCA VENTU SUPERIORE 2012, MELISSA DOP, LA PIZZUTA DEL PRINCIPE

AGLIANICO
JOURNALISTS

1, RASOTT 2012, IRPINIA CAMPI TAURASINI DOP, BOCCELLA

2, MILES 2012 CILENTO AGLIANICO DOC, CANTINE BARONE

BUYER

1, BORGOMASTRO 2007, COLLI DI SALERNO IGP, LUNAROSSA VINI E PASSIONE

2, AGLIANICO 2MILA10 2010, COLLI DI SALERNO IGP, MILA VUOLO

AGLIANICO DEL VULTURE
JOURNALISTS

1, LIKOS 2012, AGLIANICO DEL VULTURE DOC, VIGNE MASTRODOMENICO

2, AQUILA DEL VULTURE 2012, AGLIANICO DEL VULTURE DOC, LAGALA

BUYER

1, IL SIGILLO 2010, AGLIANICO DEL VULTURE DOC, CANTINE DEL NOTAIO

2, CAMERLENGO 2009, AGLIANICO DEL VULTURE DOC, CAMERLENGO

 

 

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Filed under A Vita Winery, Cataldo Calabretta Winery, Ciró, Cote di Franze Winery, Fiano Minutolo, Italian Red Wine, Italian Wine, Radici del Sud 2016, Scala Winery, Tujiano Winery

In Puglia with Radici del Sud 2016

The first time I went to Puglia was in 1983. I have gone back a number of times because of the wine, food and the unique culture. For ten years I was the sommelier/wine director of I Trulli restaurant in NYC. Trulli are the traditional cone shaped houses in Puglia, so I really got to know the wine and the food and have always enjoyed it.IMG_0708

A few months ago, Nicola Campanile, organizer of Radici del Sud 2016 in Puglia, invited me to attend the weeklong wine tasting and judging of the wines of Southern Italy.

When we arrived at the hotel, the other attendees and I, from 13 different countries, were divided into two groups: buyers and press. The buyers stayed in the hotel and tasted wine while the press spent two days and nights on the road.

Our guide and translator was Ole Udsen. The way he was greeted by the producers and others that we met showed the high regard in which he was held, so I gave him the name “Mr. Puglia.” His knowledge of the wines and the region in general, was of the highest level.IMG_0616

One of our first stops was tasting wine with the Association Nationale Le Donna Del Vino Delegazione Puglia.IMG_0617

The president of the organization is Marianna Cardone. The Women in Wine organized a tasting of 17 producers.

Marianna Cardone

Marianna Cardone

Each producer showed one wine. The format reminded me of musical chairs: I sat with a producer, tasted the wine and we talked. Then came an announcement to change places. This was done 17 times. It was very informative and enabled me to learn a lot in a short time.

Flora Saponari with the Sumaniello Rosato

Flora Saponari with the Sumaniello Rosato

There was even a type of wine I had never tasted before, the Tre Tomoli Rosa 2015 from Vignaflora, a Rosato made from the Susmaniello grape.

We also visited several wineries.IMG_0639

At the Paololeo Winery another organization DeGusto Salento: Association Del Negoamaro presented a tasting of 6 wines:

Negroamaro IGT Salento 2014 “Lago della Pergola” Vetrere

Negroamaro IGP Puglia 2013 “Taccorosso” Paolo Leo

Salice Salentino DOC Riserva 2013”Aiace” Castello Monaci

Negroamaro Salento IGP 2012 CalitroIMG_0637

Brindisi Rosso Riserva DOC 2012 “Jaddico” Tenute RubinoIMG_0638

Brindisi DOP Riserva 2011 “Vigna Flaminio” Vallone

 At the Apollonio winery we tasted 6 wines:

Negroamaro Rosato 2015 Salento IGP Santi DimitriIMG_0645

IGT Salento Rosato 2015 “Rohesia” CanteleIMG_0646

Negroamaro IGT Salento 2013 Conti ZeccaIMG_0647

Salento IGT 2013 “Mjere” Michele Caló

Salento IGT 2011 “Cento su Cento Castel di Salve

Copertino Riserva DOP 2011 “Divoto” Apollonio

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At the Garofano winery, the tasting was held outside.IMG_0652

It was so windy that they could not open the umbrellas, so we tasted in the sun as you can see from the pictures. There were 6 wines:

Copertino DOP Rosato 2015 Marulli

Salento IGT 2015 “DuodecimRomando GrecoIMG_0656

Salento Rosato IGT 2013 Vigna Mazzi Rosa Del Golfo

Nardò DOC 2014 “Danza della Contessa” Bonsegna Salento IGP 2007 “Le Braci” Garofano

Salento IGT 2006 Piromafo” Valle dell’Asso

 Wine made from the Negroamaro grape can be 100% Negroamaro or blended with other grapes as in the case of Copertino, Salice Salentino and Brindisi Rosso, or made into a rose or a white wine. I became very fond of the Negroamaro in all its forms on this trip.

We visited the town of Gallipoli on the southern tip of Puglia by the sea.IMG_0663

At Cantina Coppola 1489 we tasted white wines made from the Negroamaro grape from 2015 back to 2009.IMG_0667

Negroamaro Bianco Puglia IGT “Rocci” 100% Negroamaro. The production area is the Santo Stefano Vineyard Alezio. The soil is clayish and the training system is espalier. The harvest takes place by hand the last week of August. The wine is vinified and aged in stainless steel. I have very little experience with Negroamaro vinified as a white wine but I was very pleased with the wines I tasted,

The 2012 was the only vintage that had been aged in barriques for about six months. The wines have a simple elegance, fruitiness with good minerality and a touch of the sea. The only wine that did not have these aromas and flavors, reflecting the land and the sea was the 2012.

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Paolo Benegiamo with the Alberelli 1947

At a tasting in the Castle in Gallipoli, we played musical chairs again but here there was enough time to speak to the producer and they had more than one wine. One of the best wines I tasted made from 100% Negroamaro was the Vecchie Vigna Alberelli 1947 from L’Astore Masseria presented by the owner Paolo Benegiamo. It is a wine which makes one stop and take notice.

Giuseppe Fiorita

Giuseppe Fiorita with the Copertino Rosso

Copertino Rosso DOC Riserva 2008, Cupertinum-Antica Cantina Del Salento 1935. I sold this wine at I Trulli and always liked it. It is a great value for the price and was later picked as one of the top wines by the press.

Next time a Ciro tasting, a Fiano Minutolo tasting, the blind tasting completion and the winners.

 

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Filed under Cantina Coppola 1489, Italian Red Wine, Italian White Wine, Italian Wine, Le Donne del Vino Delegazione Puglia, Negoramaro, Negroamaro Bianco Puglia IGT Rocci, Radici del Sud 2016, Rose